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Important Dates:

 
September 24, 2014
Abstract Submission Opens

Conference Registration Opens

 
November 5, 2014
Deadline for Workshop Requests
 
November 10, 2014
Abstract Submission Deadline
 
December 1, 2014
Larry Sandler Award Submission Deadline
 
January 16, 2015
Deadline for Early (Discounted) Conference Registration
 
February 6, 2015
Deadline for Hotel Reservations
 

 

2015 Meeting Organizers:

 

Greg Beitel
Michael Eisen
Marc Freeman
Ilaria Rebay
 

Plenary & Platform Session Listing

 

PLENARY/PLATFORM SESSIONS LISTING

 


Wednesday, March 4   7:00 PM–9:15 PM

Opening General Session


Co-Moderators: Ilaria Rebay, University of Chicago, IL and Greg Beitel, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

Room: Sheraton/Chicago Center

Presentations:

7:00 pm   Welcome and Opening Remarks. Ilaria Rebay. University of Chicago, IL.

7:10 pm   GSA Update. Adam Fagen. Genetics Society of America, Bethesda, MD.

7:20 pm   Presentation of Larry Sandler Award. Erika Bach. NYU Langone Medical Center, NY.

7:25 pm   Larry Sandler Award Lecture.

7:55 pm   Keynote Address Introduction. Greg Beitel. Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

8:00 pm   Drosophila: Assuming the Mantle of Leadership in Biological Research. Allan Spradling. HHMI and Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore, MD.

9:00 pm   GSA Awards Presentation. Lynn Cooley. Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.


Thursday, March 5   8:30 AM–12:00 NOON

Plenary Session 1


Moderator: Marc Freeman, HHMI & University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

Room: Sheraton/Chicago Center

Presentations:

8:30 am   Image Award Presentation. Michelle Arbeitman. Florida State University College of Medicine, Tallahassee.

8:35 am   Cell Division and Epithelial Tissue Morphogenesis. Yohanns Bellaiche. Genetics and Developmental Biology Department, Institut Curie, Paris, France.

9:05 am   Genetic Conflicts During Meiosis Drive Innovation in Centromeric Proteins. Harmit Malik. Dept Basic Sci & HHMI, Fred Hutchinson CA Res Ctr, Seattle, WA.

9:35 am   Coordinate Migration of Mesoderm Cells in the Drosophila Embryo. Angela Stathopoulos. Division of Biology and Bioengineering, Caltech, Pasadena, CA.

10:05 am - Break

10:30 am   Signaling Kinetics in the Early Embryo. Stanislav Shvartsman. Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

11:00 am   Addressing Complexity of Notch in Cancer: When Less is More. Maria Dominguez1, Nahuel Villegas1, Ede Migh2, Vanina Da Ros1, Diana Vallejo1, Jesús García-Castillo1, Irene Gutiérrez1, Silvia Xargay3, Dolors Colomer3, Maria L. Toribio4, József Mihály2. 1) Neuroscience Institute of Alicante, UMH-CSIC, San Juan de Alicante Spain; 2) Biological Research Centre Hungarian Academy of Sciences 6726 Szeged, Temesvári krt. 62; 3) IDIBAPS-CEK Building (c/ Rosselló 149-153, Barcelona); 4) Centro de Biología Molecular "Severo Ochoa" Nicolás Cabrera 1 Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Campus de Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid.

11:30 am   Using Drosophila Neuroblasts as a Model for Stem Cell Biology and Tumorigenesis. Juergen Knoblich. IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Vienna, Austria.


Thursday, March 5   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Cell Division and Growth Control


Co-Moderators: Giovanni Bosco, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH and Nic Tapon, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, UK

Room: Sheraton 4/5

1 - 4:30
A quantitative study of the de novo nucleolus formation in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Hanieh Falahati1,2, Barbra Pelham-Webb2, Shelby Blythe2, Eric Wieschaus2. 1) Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton NJ. 08544.

2 - 4:45
Examining chromatin structure in different states of G0. Yiqin Ma, Laura Buttitta. MCDB, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

3 - 5:00
Chromatin Modifier Trithorax Regulates Systemic Signaling during Drosophila Imaginal Disc Regeneration. Andrea Skinner, Sumbul Jawed Khan, Rachel K. Smith-Bolton. Cell & Developmental Biology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL.

4 - 5:15
Growth coordination during regeneration occurs through nitric oxide regulation of steroid hormone production. Jacob Jaszczak, Jacob Wolpe, Anh Dao, Adrian Halme. Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA.

5 - 5:30
Both damage-responsive WNT expression and an age-dependent decline in regenerative capacity are mediated by a bipartite regulatory element in the WNT cluster. Robin Harris, Joshua Saul, Iswar Hariharan. MCB, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

6 - 5:45
Identification of the Dilp8 receptor and characterization of its role in the coordination of organs growth and developmental transitions. Julien Colombani, Ditte S. Andersen, Pierre Leopold. Institut of Biology Valrose (iBV), CNRS UMR7277 / INSERM UMR1091 / UNS, Nice, France.

7 - 6:00
Identification of the ligand-receptor system that governs tumor-suppressive cell competition. Tatsushi Igaki1,2, Masatoshi Yamamoto1, Kei Kunimasa1, Shizue Ohsawa1. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; 2) PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency.

8 - 6:15
Localization of Warts activation in vivo. Shuguo Sun1, Venu Reddy2, Ken Irvine1. 1) Waksman Institute, piscataway, NJ; 2) Tata Memorial Center, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.


Thursday, March 5   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Neural Development


Co-Moderators: Cheng-Yu Lee, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and Oren Schuldiner, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot

Room: Chicago 6/7

9 - 4:30
Dscam Switches Slit Repulsion to Attraction via the Robo Receptor. Maryam Alavi, Minmin Song, Gracie Andrews, Taylor Gillis, Thomas Kidd. Dept. of Biology/MS 314, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV.

10 - 4:45
Drosophila S6 kinase like inhibits neuromuscular junction growth by downregulating the BMP receptor Thickveins. Guoli Zhao1, Yingga Wu1, Li Du2, Qifu Wang1, Wenhua Li1, Yongqing Zhang1. 1) institute of genetics and developmental biology, CAS, Beijing, China; 2) College of Life Science, Hubei University, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

11 - 5:00
Hippo and its negative regulator Strip regulate synapse formation at Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions. Takahiro Chihara1,2, Chisako Sakuma1, Yoshie Saito1, Tomoki Umehara1, Keisuke Kamimura3, Timothy Mosca4, Nobuaki Maeda3, Masayuki Miura1,2. 1) Dept Gen, Grad Sch Pharm, Univ Tokyo, Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 2) CREST, JST, Japan; 3) Dept of Brain Dev and Neural Reg, Tokyo Metro Inst of Med Sci, Japan; 4) Dept of Biol, HHMI, Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA.

12 - 5:15
Tenectin (Tnc) recruits Integrins to stabilize postsynaptic structures at the Drosophila NMJ. Qi Wang, TaeHee Han, Mihaela Serpe. NICHD/NIH, Bethesda, MD.

13 - 5:30
Specification of individual adult motor neuron morphologies by combinatorial transcription factor codes. Jonathan Enriquez1, Myungin Baek2, Meredith Peterson1, Lalanti Venkatasubramanian1, Ulkar Aghayeva1, Richard Mann1. 1) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysic, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; 2) NYU Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, NYU School of Medicine.

14 - 5:45
Molecular Dissection of a Cell Specification Regulatory Cascade. Johannes Stratmannn1, Hugo Gabolindo2, Jonathan Benito-Sipos2, Stefan Thor1. 1) Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, SWEDEN; 2) Departamento de Biología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E 28049 Madrid, SPAIN.

15 - 6:00
Morphogenesis and development of the postembryonic cortex glial niche. Renee Read, Coston Rowe. Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

16 - 6:15
A novel neurotrophic pathway regulates core features of neuronal identity. Colleen McLaughlin, Heather Broihier. Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.


Thursday, March 5   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Organogenesis and Gametogenesis


Co-Moderators: Lan Jiang, Oakland University, Rochester, MI and Erika Matunis, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Room: Chicago 8-10

17 - 4:30
Molecular and cellular mechanism of epithelial invagination in the Drosophila salivary gland. Se-Yeon Chung, Sangjoon Kim, Deborah Andrew. Dept Cell Biol, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD.

18 - 4:45
Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate cardiac progenitor specification by controlling the expression of receptors of the fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways. Shaad M. Ahmad1, Pritha Bhattacharyya1, Neal Jeffries2, Stephen S. Gisselbrecht3, Alan M. Michelson1. 1) Laboratory of Developmental Systems Biology, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD; 2) Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD; 3) Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

19 - 5:00
The adult midgut progenitor cells are established through asymmetric cell division. Jessica R. K. Seifert1,2, Ruth Lehmann2. 1) Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY; 2) NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY.

20 - 5:15
The Wnt signaling and cytoskeletal regulator APC2 controls stem cell niche size, architecture, and stem cell number in the Drosophila ovary. Stacie Oliver, Ezgi Kunttas-Tatli, David Vinson, Brooke McCartney. Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

21 - 5:30
Investigating the role of pHi in promoting stem cell differentiation. Bryne Ulmschneider1, Bree Grillo-Hill2, Diane Barber2, Todd Nystul1. 1) Anatomy, University of California, SF, San Francisco, CA; 2) Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, SF, San Francisco, CA.

22 - 5:45
Sex-lethal, Set1, and sexual identity in the adult female germline. Anne Smolko, Helen Salz. Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

23 - 6:00
The role of the PIWI/piRNA pathway in the maintenance of genomic integrity. S. Mani, M. Zhong, N. Liu, H. Lin. Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

24 - 6:15
Follicular adrenergic signaling plays an essential and conserved role in Drosophila ovulation. Lylah Deady1, Jianjun Sun1,2. 1) Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; 2) Institute for Systems Genomics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.


Friday, March 6   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Cell Cycle and Cell Death


Co-Moderators: Bruce A. Edgar, DKFZ & Center for Molecular Biology, University of Heidelberg, Germany and Masayuki Miura, The University of Tokyo, Japan

Room: Sheraton 4/5

25 - 8:30
A novel regulator of cell death, Bulsa, controls nuclear shrinkage during apoptosis. Yunsik Kang1, Gina Castelvecchi1,2, Doug Braun1, Arash Bashirullah1. 1) University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Washington University, St. Louis,MO.

26 - 8:45
Neural stem cell progeny regulate stem cell death in Notch and Hox dependent manner. Richa Arya, Tatevik Sarkissian, Kristin White. CBRC, MGH/HARVARD, CHARLESTOWN, MA.

27 - 9:00
A Krebs cycle component and the mitochondria limit the rate of caspase activation during spermatid remodeling. Lior Aram, Carmel Braverman, Yosef Kaplan, Liat Ravid, Eli Arama. Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

28 - 9:15
Extracellular reactive oxygen species drive apoptosis-induced proliferation. Caitlin Fogarty, Jillian Lindblad, Neha Diwanji, Meghana Tare, Andreas Bergmann. Dept of Cancer Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.

29 - 9:30
The role of innate immune pathways in cell competition. Stefanie N. Meyer1, Marc Amyoel2,3, Cora Bergantinos2, Konrad Basler1, Laura Johnston2. 1) University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2) Columbia University, New York, NY USA; 3) New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY USA.

30 - 9:45
Fly-FUCCI - a versatile tool for studying cell proliferation in complex tissues. Norman Zielke, Jerome Korzelius, Monique van Straaten, Katharina Bender, Gregor Schuhknecht, Devanjali Dutta, Jinyi Xiang, Bruce Edgar. Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) - Zentrum für Molekulare Biologie der Universität Heidelberg (ZMBH) Allianz, Im Neuenheimer Feld 282, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

31 - 10:00
Indispensable pre-mitotic endocycles promote aneuploidy in the Drosophila rectum. Kevin Schoenfelder1, Ruth Montague1, Sarah Paramore1, Ashley Lennox1, Anthony Mahowald2, Donald Fox1. 1) Duke University, Durham, NC; 2) University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.


Friday, March 6   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Evolution and Quantitative Genetics I


Moderator: Erin Kelleher, University of Houston, TX

Room: Chicago 6/7

32 - 8:30
The couch potato gene mediates life history plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster. Katherine R. O'Brien1,2, Paul S. Schmidt2. 1) Biology, University of Nebraska , Lincoln, NE; 2) Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

33 - 8:45
Investigating the molecular basis of species interactions: Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria are required for optimal attractiveness to Drosophila melanogaster. Kelly Schiabor1, Allison Quan1, Michael Eisen1,2. 1) Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Berkeley, CA.

34 - 9:00
Mitochondrial DNA x nuclear DNA interactions and environment modify fitness in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). Jim Mossman, Leann Biancani, Marissa Holmbeck, Lei Zhu, David Rand. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI.

35 - 9:15
Contribution of sex, genotype, and environment to individual gene expression profiles. Kseniya Golovnina1, Yanzhu Lin2, Zhenxia Chen1, Haiwang Yang1, Hina Sultana1, Brian Oliver1, Susan Harbison2. 1) NIH/NIDDK, Bethesda, MD; 2) NIH/NHLBI, Bethesda, MD.

36 - 9:30
The evolution of maternal mRNA deposition and zygotic genome activation across 14 Drosophila species. Joel Atallah, Susan E. Lott. Evolution & Ecology, University of California - Davis, Davis, CA.

37 - 9:45
Logic and mechanism of natural variation in the compound eye. Ariane Ramaekers1, Simon Weinberger1, Annelies Claeys1, Erich Buchner2, Reinhard Wolf3, Bassem Hassan1. 1) VIB - KULeuven,Belgium; 2) University Hospital Würzburg, Germany; 3) University of Würzburg, Germany.

38 - 10:00
The molecular mechanism behind the evolution of a novel sex-specific trait. Gavin Rice1, Olga Barmina1, Michelle Arbeitman2, Artyom Kopp1. 1) Evolution and Ecology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA; 2) College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.


Friday, March 6   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Neurophysiology and Behavior I


Co-Moderators: Coral Warr, Monash University, Clayton, Australia and John Ewer, Universidad de Valparaiso, Chile

Room: Chicago 8-10

39 - 8:30
Talking Flies: Predator-induced changes in behavior can be socially communicated from exposed to naïve flies. Giovanni Bosco1, Balint Kacsoh1, Julianna Bozler1, Mani Ramaswami2. 1) Genetics & Norris Cotton Cancer Ctr, Geisel Sch Med at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH; 2) Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.

40 - 8:45
Charaterization of a long-distance neurotransmitter recycling pathway essential for Drosophila visual transmission. Ratna Chaturvedi, Hong-Sheng Li. Department of Neurobiology , University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.

41 - 9:00
Maturation of central brain flight circuit in Drosophila requires Fz2/Ca2+ signaling. Tarjani Agrawal, Gaiti Hasan. NCBS-TIFR, Bangalore, India.

42 - 9:15
Systematic characterization of sensorimotor transformations in the Drosophila larva. Luis A. Hernandez Nunez, Mason Klein, Lindsey Claus, Aravinthan Samuel. Department of Physics and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

43 - 9:30
Drosophila exercise-training requires octopaminergic neuron activity. Alyson Sujkowski, Robert Wessells. Wayne State School of Medicine, Detroit, MI.

44 - 9:45
Sensorimotor transformation of cooling in the Drosophila larva. M. Klein1, B. Afonso1,2, M. Berck1, L. Hernandez-Nunez1, L. Ni3, M. Zlatic2, P. A. Garrity3, A. D. T. Samuel1. 1) Dept. of Physics and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; 2) HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA; 3) Dept. of Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA.

45 - 10:00
An RNAi/CRISPR screen for novel regulators of synaptic development and function. C. Dustin Rubinstein1, Caley A. Hogan2, Nathan J. Carpenter1, Emily M. Fong1, Grace Heglund-Lohman1, Anna E. Zeidman1,3, Gene H. Thiede1, Kate M. O'Connor-Giles1,4. 1) Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Genetics Training Program, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 3) IBS-SRP, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 4) Department of Genetics, U. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.


Friday, March 6   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Evolution and Quantitative Genetics II


Co-Moderators: Mariana Wolfner, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York and Susan Lott, University of California, Davis

Room: Chicago 6/7

46 - 10:45
Krüppel expression levels are maintained through compensatory evolution of shadow enhancers. Zeba Wunderlich1, Meghan D. J. Bragdon1, Ben J. Vincent1, Jonathan White2, Angela H. DePace1. 1) Systems Biol, Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA; 2) Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA.

47 - 11:00
Evolution of the Novel Gene Zeus. Robert Arthur1,3, Benjamin Krinsky1,2, Kevin White1,2,4, Manyuan Long1. 1) Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2) Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 3) Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; 4) Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

48 - 11:15
Mapping genetic background effects on transvection. Teresa Rzezniczak, Thomas J. S. Merritt. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

49 - 11:30
Intragenomic conflict and satellite DNA evolution in Drosophila. Amanda M. Larracuente, Daniel E. Khost, Anthony Geneva. Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

50 - 11:45
P-element invasion of Drosophila simulans. Andrea Betancourt, Tom Hill, Robert Kofler, Viola Nolte, Christian Schlötterer. Institute for Populationsgenetik, Vetmeduni Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

51 - 12:00
African and European admixture in southeast US and Caribbean Islands populations of Drosophila melanogaster affect postmating reproductive phenotypes. Joyce Kao1,2, Asif Zubair1, Matthew Salomon1, Seana Lymer1,2, Sea Hwang1, Albert Sung1, Daniel Campo1, Sergey Nuzhdin1. 1) University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; 2) New York University, New York, NY.

52 - 12:15
Natural Selection Shapes the Mosaic Ancestry of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel and the D. melanogaster Reference Genome. John Pool. Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI.


Friday, March 6   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Chromatin and Epigenetics


Co-Moderators: Felice Elefant, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA and Xin Chen, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Room: Sheraton 4/5

53 - 10:45
Three-step mechanism for the spatial and cell-cycle dynamics of pericentric chromatin. Eric Joyce, Tharanga Senaratne, Ting Wu. Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

54 - 11:00
Mrg15-dependent binding of Cap-H2 to chromatin is required for chromosome organization and regulation of gene expression. Heather Wallace1, Huy Nguyen1, Julianna Bozler1, Gregory Rogers2, Giovanni Bosco1. 1) Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover , NH; 2) Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

55 - 11:15
Trimethylation of Histone H3 at lysine 27 by Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 and its role in epigenetic memory. Rory T. Coleman, Gary Struhl. Department of Genetics and Development, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY.

56 - 11:30
Tip60 HAT Action in Environmental Enrichment induced Cognitive Restoration. Songjun Xu. Biology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

57 - 11:45
Dietary restriction reduces transposable element expression in aging Drosophila heads. Jason G. Wood, Brian C. Jones, Nan Jiang, Stephen L. Helfand. Dept. of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI.

58 - 12:00
A novel chromatin factor Enhancer of Polycomb acts in somatic cells to maintain germ cell identity and activity in Drosophila adult testis. Lijuan Feng, Zhen Shi, Xin Chen. Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

59 - 12:15
Impacts of centromere misregulation on genome stability and cancer progression in a Drosophila model of glioblastoma. Nicole Beier1,2, Renee Read3, Gary Karpen1,2. 1) Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California Berkeley; 2) Genome Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; 3) Emory University.


Friday, March 6   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Neurophysiology and Behavior II


Co-Moderators: Coral Warr, Monash University, Clayton, Australia and John Ewer, Universidad de Valparaiso, Chile

Room: Chicago 8-10

60 - 10:45
Physiological connectivity and inter-clock coupling in the Drosophila circadian clock neuron network. Zepeng Yao, Jenna Clem, Amy Bennett, Orie Shafer. Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

61 - 11:00
Dynamic central neuron activities that underlie courtship pursuit in Drosophila male. S. Kohatsu, D. Yamamoto. Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

62 - 11:15
Previous socio-sexual experience modulates the mating investmentof male Drosophila melanogaster. Woo Jae Kim1, Yuh Nung Jan2, Lily Yeh Jan2. 1) Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Departments of Physiology, Biochemistry, and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA.

63 - 11:30
Physiological and behavioural correlates of natural variation in an insect olfactory receptor. Katherine H. Shaw1,2, Alisha Anderson2, Marien de Bruyne1, Coral G. Warr1. 1) Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia; 2) Ecosystems Sciences, CSIRO, Black Mountain, ACT, Australia.

64 - 11:45
New Pheromones and Olfactory Receptor Pathways Mediating Behavior in Larvae. Jonathan T. Clark, Anandasankar Ray. University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA.

65 - 12:00
Innexin7 containing gap junctions in Drosophila Antennal Lobe Projection Neurons contribute to synchronous neuronal activity and olfactory responses. Jorge M. Campusano1, Nicolás Fuenzalida-Uribe1, Bryon Silva1, Diane K. O'Dowd2. 1) Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2) Dept. Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California Irvine.

66 - 12:15
Photoreceptor neurotransduction requires a conserved Ncc69 activating kinase cascade specifically in glia. Drew Stenesen1, Jeffrey Schellinger2, Aylin Rodan2, Helmut Krämer1. 1) Neuroscience, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; 2) Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.


Friday, March 6   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Physiology, Organismal Growth and Aging I
This session made possible in part by generous support from Division of Aging Biology at National Institute on Aging


Co-Moderators: David Walker, University of California, Los Angeles and Joanna Chiu, University of California, Davis

Room: Sheraton 4/5

67 - 4:30
Male Costs of Reproduction are Self-Imposed and Mediated by Perception of the Opposite Sex. Zachary Harvanek1, Emily Feuka1, Sean Kelly1,2, Scott Pletcher1. 1) Mol/Int Physiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2) Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

68 - 4:45
Tissue specific orchestration of nutrient dependent responses in D. Melanogaster. Guiping Du, Patrick Wai-Lun Li, Artem Zykovich, Kazutaka Akagi, Sean D. Mooney, Simon Melov, Pankaj Kapahi. Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA.

69 - 5:00
A novel role for Dpp as an endocrine signal potentially linking growth status to the regulation of ecdysteroidogenesis and developmental progression. Linda Setiawan, Iswar K. Hariharan. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

70 - 5:15
Metabolic processes implicated in developmental robustness under thermal stress. Steven G. Kuntz1, Anthony T. Iavarone1, Kelly M. Schiabor2, Peter A. Combs3, Michael B. Eisen1,4. 1) QB3, UC Berkeley, CA; 2) Molecular and Cell Biology, UC Berkeley, CA; 3) Biophysics Grad Group, UC Berkeley, CA; 4) HHMI, Berkeley, CA.

71 - 5:30
A new mechanism of sexual differentiation controls sexually dimorphic physiology in the adult intestine. Bruno Hudry, Irene Miguel-Aliaga. MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

72 - 5:45
Activinβ/TGF-β signaling in skeletal muscle controls insulin signaling and metabolism to influence final body size. Lindsay Moss-Taylor1, Michael O'Connor2. 1) Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology, and Genetics Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 2) Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

73 - 6:00
Let-7 Overexpression Extends Longevity and Alters Fat Metabolism in Female Drosophila Melanogaster. Christi Gendron, Scott Pletcher. The Geriatric Center and the Molecular and Integrative Physiology Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

74 - 6:15
Regulation of protein consumption by an ovarian peptide transporter. Sonali Deshpande, William Ja. Metabolism and Aging, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL.


Friday, March 6   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Pattern Formation (4 Talks) and RNA Biology (4 Talks)


Co-Moderators: Marek Mlodzik, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York and Zeba Wunderlich, University of California, Irvine and Mitzi Kuroda, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA and Nelson Lau, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

Room: Chicago 6/7

75 - 4:30
Muscle migration is directed by a combination of intrinsic polarity and short-range signaling. Elly Ordan1, Marko Brankatschk2, Barry Dickson3, Frank Schnorrer4, Talila Volk1. 1) molecular genetics, Weizmann Institute of Sc1-Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israelience, Rehovot, Israel; 2) 2-Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), A-1030 Vienna, Austria. Present address: Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany; 3) Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), A-1030 Vienna, Austria; 4) 4-Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.

76 - 4:45
Understanding EGFR activation in patterning the proximal-distal axis of the Drosophila leg. S. Tozier1, R. Voutev2, R. S. Mann2. 1) Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY; 2) Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY.

77 - 5:00
Nemo kinase: a multi-step regulator of planar cell polarity. Giovanna M. Collu1, Konstantin Gaengel1, Ivana Mirkovic1, Wang A. Yanfeng1, Mei-Ling Chin1, Andreas Jenny2, Marek Mlodzik1. 1) Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; 2) Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology Department of Genetics Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

78 - 5:15
Notch-Dependent Tissue Folding Determines Boundary between Developmental Fields. Hui-Yu Ku1,2, Y. Henry Sun1,2. 1) Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 2) Institute of Genome Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

79 - 5:30
Systematic analysis of protein-RNA interactions in Drosophila. John Laver1, Xiao Li1, Hong Na1, Juhyun Jeon1, Fateh Singh1, Timothy Westwood2, Philip Kim1, Sachdev Sidhu1, Quaid Morris1, Craig Smibert1,3, Howard Lipshitz1. 1) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto; 3) Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto.

80 - 5:45
Targeted degradation of Gadd45 mRNA by the nonsense-mediated decay pathway is essential for viability. Jonathan O. Nelson, Alex Chapin, Mark M. Metzstein. Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

81 - 6:00
Cis-regulation of miRNA clusters tempers strong miRNA phenotypes. Mary Truscott1, Abul Bmmk Islam2, Maxim Frolov1. 1) Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; 2) Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

82 - 6:15
The evolution of Drosophilid piRNA generating clusters is extremely rapid and variable. Gung-wei Chirn1, Reazur Rahman1, Yuliya Sytnikova1, Jessica Matts1, Cosmas Arnold2, Alexander Stark2, Michael Yu3, Bonnie Berger3, Nelson Lau1. 1) Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham,MA, USA; 2) Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna Biocenter, Austria; 3) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA USA.


Friday, March 6   4:30 PM–6:30 PM

Techniques and Resources


Co-Moderators: Guanjun Gao, Tsinghua University, Beijing and Kate O'Connor-Giles, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Room: Chicago 8-10

83 - 4:30
Development of high pressure freezing and correlative light/electron microscopy for Drosophila larvae identifies novel subcellular lumen intermediates. Linda Nikolova1,2, Mark Metzstein1. 1) Dept Human Gen, Univ Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 2) Electron Microscopy Core Laboratory, Univ Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

84 - 4:45
A genome-wide resource for the analysis of gene function and protein localization in Drosophila. Mihail Sarov1, Christiane Barz2, Katja Finkl2, Marco Hein2, Stephan Janosch1, Nicole Plewka2, Bettina Stender2, Dana Suchold1, Vinay Vikas3, Matthias Mann2, Mani Ramaswami4, K. VijayRaghavan3, Pavel Tomancak1, Frank Schnorrer2. 1) Max Planck Institute of Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany; 2) Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany; 3) National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, India; 4) Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

85 - 5:00
Computational tissue labeling: Tissue and Cellular Recognition in Developing Drosophila Embryos. Soile V. E. Keranen1, Jonathan T. Barron2, Pablo Arbeláez2, Mark D. Biggin1, Jitendra Malik2, David W. Knowles1. 1) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; 2) University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

86 - 5:15
Model-driven data visualization and quantitative animation of developmental signaling. Bomyi Lim1, Carmeline Silva2, Adam Finkelstein3, Ioannis Kevrekidis2, Stanislav Shvartsman1. 1) Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, NJ; 2) Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, NJ; 3) Department of Computer Science, Princeton University, NJ.

87 - 5:30
High-throughput Investigation of Drosophila Brains via Structure-Based Similarity. Florian Ganglberger1, Laszlo Tirian2, Florian Schulze1, Andrew Straw2, Katja Bühler1. 1) VRVis Research Center, Vienna, Austria; 2) Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria.

88 - 5:45
An automated image analysis tool to track cell divisions during Drosophila axis elongation. Michael F. Z. Wang1, Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez1,2,3. 1) Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 2) Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3) Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

89 - 6:00
FlyVar: a database for genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster. Rui Chen1,2, Lichu Jiang1, Yong Chen4, Nele Haelterman3, Hugo Bellen2,3,5, Fei Wang4. 1) HGSC,Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; 2) Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; 3) Program of Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; 4) Information Processing, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 5) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

90 - 6:15
Identification of novel drug targets for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex by cross-species synthetic screens combining CRISPR-based knockouts with RNAi. Benjamin E. Housden1, Alexander J. Valvezan2, Colleen Kelley1, Richelle Sopko1, Yanhui Hu1, Charles Roesel1, Shuailiang Lin1, Michael Buckner1, Rong Tao1, Bahar Yilmazel1, Stephanie E. Mohr1, Brendan D. Manning2, Norbert Perrimon1,3. 1) Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 2) Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.


Saturday, March 7   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Cell Biology and Signal Transduction


Co-Moderators: Utpal Banerjee, University of California, Los Angeles and Andrew Zelhof, Indiana University, Bloomington

Room: Sheraton 4/5

91 - 8:30
Cooperation of Mad and Akt signaling in a Drosophila model of epithelial plasticity. Courtney Onodera4,5, Björn Gärtner6, Katrina S. Gold2,5, Samantha Aguinaldo-Wetterholm2,5, David Casso2,5, J. Alex Rondon2,5,7, Yoko Katsuno2,5, Samuel Meier6, Aiguo Tian2,5,8, Rik Derynck1,2,3,5, Jun S. Song4,5,9, Julia Zeitlinger6, Katja Brückner1,2,3,5. 1) Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research; 2) Department of Cell and Tissue Biology; 3) Cardiovascular Research Institute; 4) Institute for Human Genetics; 5) University of California San Francisco, CA; 6) Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO; 7) present address: Genentech; 8) present address: UT Southwestern; 9) present address: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

92 - 8:45
Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity. William Palmer, Dongyu Jia, Wu-Min Deng. Dept Biological Sci, Florida State Univ, Tallahassee, FL.

93 - 9:00
Drosophila Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 mediates long-distance attenuation of follicle stem cell proliferation by cleaving Dlp to inhibit Wg diffusion. Xiaoxi Wang1,2, Andrea Page-McCaw1,2,3. 1) Development of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; 2) Program in Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; 3) Development of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

94 - 9:15
Ion channel function regulates Dpp release to correctly specify pattern. Emily Bates, Giri Dahal, Sarala Pradhan, Colleen Bartman. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.

95 - 9:30
Secretion and exovesicle mediated transport of the Hedgehog morphogen is regulated by the ESCRT complex. T. Matusek, F. Wendler, M. Fürthauer, S. Pizette, G. D'Angelo, P. Thérond. Institute of Biology Valrose, UNS - CNRS UMR7277 - Inserm U1091, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108, Nice cedex 2, France.

96 - 9:45
Nanotubes mediate the niche-stem cell signaling in Drosophila testis. M. Inaba1,2,3, M. Buszczak2, YM. Yamashita1,3. 1) Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2) Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI.

97 - 10:00
Rme-8 depletion perturbs Notch recycling and predisposes to pathogenic signalling. Maria J. Gomez-Lamarca1, Laura A. Snowdon1, Ekatarina Seib2, Thomas Klein2, Sarah J. Bray1. 1) Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; 2) Institute of Genetics, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Universitätsstr. 1 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.


Saturday, March 7   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Drosophila Models of Human Disease I


Co-Moderators: Tom Lloyd, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD and Sheng Zhang, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

Room: Chicago 6/7

98 - 8:30
Human and fly genetics implicate a CD2AP/cindr susceptibility network at synapses in Alzheimer’s disease. Nikolaos Giagtzoglou1,2, Paula Porter1,2, Kathleen Quast1,2, Benjamin Arenkiel1,2, Joshua Shulman1,2. 1) Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; 2) Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Houston, TX.

99 - 8:45
The PINK1/Parkin Pathway Regulates the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Localization and Translation of Select Nuclear-Encoded Respiratory Chain Component mRNAs. Stephan Gehrke1, Zhihao Wu1, Michael Klinkenberg2, Georg Auburger2, Su Guo3, Bingwei Lu1. 1) Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; 2) Experimental Neurology, Goethe University Medical School, Theodor Stern Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany; 3) Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Programs in Biological Sciences and Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

100 - 9:00
The ALS/FTD C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport via RanGAP1. Ke Zhang1, Christopher Donnelly2, Aaron Haeusler3, Rita Sattler2, Jiou Wang3, Jeffrey Rothstein1,2,4,5, Thomas Lloyd1,4. 1) Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. 21205; 2) Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. 21205; 3) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. 21205; 4) The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience,Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. 21205; 5) Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. 21205.

101 - 9:15
Inter-cellular transmission of huntingtin aggregates in the Drosophila central nervous system. Margaret Pearce1, Ellen Spartz1, Weizhe Hong1,2, Liqun Luo1,2, Ron Kopito1. 1) Stanford University, Stanford, CA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

102 - 9:30
Neuronal mitochondrial defects elevate synthesis of lipid droplets in glia and promote neurodegeneration. Lucy Liu1, Ke Zhang2, Hector Sandoval3, Shinya Yamamoto3,4,5, Manish Jaiswal3,6, Elisenda Sanz7, Zhihong Li3, Jessica Hui7, Brett Graham3, Albert Quintana7,8,9, Hugo Bellen1,2,3,4,5,6. 1) Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine; 2) Structural and Computational Biology & Molecular Biophysics Graduate Program, Baylor College of Medicine; 3) Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine; 4) Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine; 5) Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital; 6) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030; 7) Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children’s Research Institute; 8) Center for Developmental Therapeutics,; 9) Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195.

103 - 9:45
The Bubblegum model of Adrenoleukodystrophy provides a basis for new therapeutic approaches. Hannah B. Gordon, Anthea Letsou. Eccles Institute of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

104 - 10:00
Mutations in SLC25A, a mitochondrial carrier protein, protect against systemic manganese-induced neuronal toxicity. Jan R. Slabbaert1,2, Sabine Kuenen1,2, Ana Clara Fernandes1,2, Jef Swerts1,2, Valerie Uytterhoeven1,2, Jaroslaw Kasprowicz1,2, Ronny Blust3, Patrik Verstreken1,2. 1) Center for the Biology of Disease, VIB, Leuven, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium; 2) Center for Human Genetics and Leuven Research Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases (LIND), KULeuven, Leuven, Vlaams-Brabant, Belgium; 3) Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.


Saturday, March 7   8:30 AM–10:15 AM

Regulation of Gene Expression I


Co-Moderators: Sarah Bray, University of Cambridge, England and Melissa Harrison, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Room: Chicago 8-10

105 - 8:30
Early zygotic dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster is Sxl dependent. Susan E. Lott1,2, Jacqueline E. Villalta3, Michael B. Eisen2,3. 1) Evolution and Ecology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA; 2) Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

106 - 8:45
Low affinity binding site clusters confer Hox specificity and regulatory robustness. Justin Crocker1, Namiko Abe2, Lucrezia Rinaldi2, Alistair P. McGregor3, Nicolás Frankel4, Shu Wang5, Ahmad Alsawadi6,7, Philippe Valenti6,7, Serge Plaza6,7, François Payre6,7, Richard S. Mann2, David L. Stern1. 1) HHMI Janelia, Ashburn, VA; 2) Columbia University Medical Center; 3) Oxford Brookes University; 4) Universidad de Buenos Aires; 5) New Jersey Neuroscience Institute; 6) Centre de Biologie du Développement; 7) CNRS.

107 - 9:00
A cell type specific transcriptional repressor directs selective upregulation of terminal differentiation program. Jongmin Kim, Margaret Fuller. Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

108 - 9:15
Genome-wide futile cycling by Hairy transcriptional repressor reveals mechanism for development of nascent gene regulatory networks. Kurtulus Kok2, Ahmet Ay3, David Arnosti1,2. 1) Dept Biochem & Molec Biol, Michigan State Univ, East Lansing, MI; 2) Program in Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; 3) Departments of Biology and Mathematics, Colgate University, Hamilton NY.

109 - 9:30
Color vision: Single base differences in a shared cis-regulatory element are critical for rhodopsin expression in distinct photoreceptor subtypes. Jens Rister, Claude Desplan. Department of Biology, New York University, New York City, NY.

110 - 9:45
Integration of repressive and patterning inputs at cardiac gene loci. Jemma Webber, Ilaria Rebay. Ben May Dept Cancer Res, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

111 - 10:00
Differential binding and activation of enhancers by Bcd and Otd in the embryo. Rhea Datta1, Danyang Yu2, Stephen Small1. 1) Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY; 2) Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1000 River Road, Teaneck NJ 07666.


Saturday, March 7   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Cell Biology and Cytoskeleton I


Co-Moderators: Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez, University of Toronto. Ontario and Denise Montel, University of California, Santa Barbara

Room: Sheraton 4/5

112 - 10:45
An Evolutionarily Conserved Polybasic Motif Mediates the Plasma Membrane Targeting of Lgl and Its Regulation by Hypoxia. Yang Hong, Wei Dong, Xuejing Zhang, Weijie Liu, Yi-jiun Chen, Juan Huang. Dept Cell Biol & Physiology, Univ Pittsburgh Med Sch, Pittsburgh, PA.

113 - 11:00
Huntingtin transports a novel class of vesicles on Drosophila larval axons. J. White, E. Anderson, K. Zimmerman, K. H. Zheng, R. Rouhani, T. Kelsang, S. Gunawardena. Biological Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

114 - 11:15
Maturation of cytokinetic ring and abscission in Drosophila polarized epithelial cells. Roland Le Borgne, Emeline Daniel, Irina Kolotueva. Institut de Génétique et Développement de Rennes, CNRS UMR 6290, Rennes, France.

115 - 11:30
Detachment versus cohesion: novel roles for PDZ-GEF and Rap1 during collective cell migration. Ketki Sawant1,2, George Aranjuez2,3, Jocelyn McDonald1,2,3. 1) 1Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, Cleveland State University, OH; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic , OH; 3) Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, case Western Reserve University, OH.

116 - 11:45
Linking epithelial apical-basal polarity to cell height determination via the microtubule minus end protector Patronin. Michiko Takeda, Yu-Chiun Wang. Laboratory for Epithelial Morphogenesis, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan.

117 - 12:00
An essential morphogenetic role for Integrins in regulating tissue level tensile force by modulation of cell mobility. Emily Lostchuck1, Stephanie J. Ellis1, Katharine E. Goodwin1, Teresa Zulueta-Coarasa2, Daniela Gunne1, Sabrina Wistorf1, Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez2, James Feng3, Guy Tanentzapf1. 1) Cell and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Department of Cell and Systems Biology at the University of Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G5, Canada; 3) Dept of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

118 - 12:15
Combining imaging and genetics to elucidate how integrin adhesion sites are built. Nicholas H. Brown1,2, Natalia Bulgakova1,2, Annabel G. M. Griffiths1,2, Yoshiko Inoue1,2, Maddy Parsons3, Robert Stojnic2. 1) Gurdon Institute, Univ Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 2) Dept of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Univ Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 3) Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics, King’s College London, London, UK.


Saturday, March 7   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Drosophila Models of Human Disease II


Co-Moderators: Erika Bach, NYU School of Medicine, New York and Renee Read, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

Room: Chicago 6/7

119 - 10:45
Malignant Drosophila tumors interrupt insulin signaling to induce cachexia-like wasting. Alejandra Figueroa-Clarevega, David Bilder. Molecular and Cell Biology, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

120 - 11:00
Tumor progression by a genetic heterogeneity of cell clones with distinct oncogenic activities. M. Enomoto1, D. Takemoto1, T. Igaki1,2. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Japan; 2) PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Japan.

121 - 11:15
Conserved Rab-11 regulation of intestinal inflammation as potential therapeutic targets in colon cancer. Yingchao Nie1, Shiyan Yu3, Alla Amcheslavsky1, Qi Li1, Zhong Jiang2, Nan Gao3, Tony Ip1. 1) Program in Molecular Medicine, UMASS Medical School, Worcester, MA; 2) Department of Pathology, UMASS Medical School, Worcester, MA; 3) Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ.

122 - 11:30
Using Drosophila to Develop Drug Cocktails to Treat Multiple Cancer Networks. T. K. Das, J. Esernio, R. L. Cagan. DRB, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

123 - 11:45
Mechanism of the metabolic shift induced by activating oncogenic pathways in Drosophila tumorigenesis. Cheng-Wei Wang1, Arunima Purkayastha1, Kevin T. Jones1, Wei Liao1, Utpal Banerjee1,2,3,4,5. 1) Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology; 2) Department of Biological Chemistry; 3) Molecular Biology Institute; 4) Broad Stem Cell Research Center; 5) Minor in Biomedical Research, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095.

124 - 12:00
Obesity-induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Starvation-Selected Drosophila. Christopher Hardy1, Ryan Birse2, Matthew Wolf3, Allen Gibbs1. 1) School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV. 89154; 2) Development, Aging and Regeneration Program, Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA. 92037; 3) School of Medicine - Cardiology, Duke University, DUMC 103208, Durham, NC, 27710.

125 - 12:15
Muscle specific depletion of twinstar in Drosophila phenocopies Nemaline Myopathy. Mridula Balakrishnan1,2, Shannon F. Yu1, Mary K. Baylies1. 1) Developmental Biology, Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, NY; 2) Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences, New York, NY.


Saturday, March 7   10:45 AM–12:30 PM

Gene Expression and Chromatin II


Co-Moderators: Angela DePace, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA and Tiffany Cook, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH

Room: Chicago 8-10

126 - 10:45
Transcriptional activation by a low-complexity domain is a conserved feature of Zelda and orthologous proteins. Danielle Hamm, Eliana Bondra, Melissa Harrison. Dept. of Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

127 - 11:00
Discovery of Novel Enhancers Using Natural Variation. Ashley Jermusyk, Sarah Gharavi, Gregory Reeves. Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

128 - 11:15
Shadow enhancers enable Hunchback bifunctionality in the Drosophila embryo. M. Staller, B. Vincent, M. Bragdon, J. Estrada, Z. Wunderlich, A. DePace. Systems Biol, Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA.

129 - 11:30
Changes in a P-MAD binding site underlie species diversity of wishful thinking patterning. Rob Marmion1, Milica Jevtic2, George Pyrowolakis2, Nir Yakoby1. 1) Biology Department and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ; 2) Institute for Biology I, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

130 - 11:45
A genetic screen for new Polycomb group genes. James Kennison, Monica Cooper. Genomics of Differentiation, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, MD.

131 - 12:00
Super-resolution imaging of chromatin nanostructure reveals tight coupling of epigenetic state and 3D genome organization. Alistair Boettiger1, Bogdan Bintu2, Jeff Moffitt1, Brian Beliveau4, Chao-ting Wu4, Xiaowei Zhuang1,2,3. 1) Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; 2) Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; 4) Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

132 - 12:15
The RNA binding protein Arrest (Aret) regulates myofibril maturation in Drosophila flight muscle. M. Spletter1, C. Barz1, A. Yeroslaviz1, C. Schönbauer1, D. Gerlach3, I. Ferreira1, M. Sarov4, A. Stark2, B. Habermann1, F. Schnorrer1. 1) Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany; 2) Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria; 3) Boehringer Ingelheim RCV GmbH & Co KG, Vienna, Austria; 4) Max-Planck-Institute of Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany.

133 - 12:30
Ultraconserved core elements are an essential feature of insect enhancers. Thomas Brody, Ward Odenwald. Neural Cell-Fate Determinants Section, NINDS/NIH, Bethesda, MD.


Saturday, March 7   4:00 PM–6:00 PM

Cell Biology and Cytoskeleton II


Co-Moderators: Denise Montel, University of California, Santa Barbara and Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez, University of Toronto, Ontario

Room: Sheraton 4/5

134 - 4:00
Wash interacts with Lamin and affects global nuclear organization. J. Verboon, H. Rincon-Arano, B. Sugumar, T. Werwie, D. Scalzo, V. Nandakumar, J. Delrow, M. Groudine, S. Parkhurst. Div Basic Sci, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res Ctr, Seattle, WA.

135 - 4:15
Compliance sensing by actomyosin self-organization determines the direction of tensile force during morphogenesis. Soline Chanet1, Callie Miller2, Bard Ermentrout3, Eeshit Vaishnav1, Lance Davidson4, Adam Martin1. 1) Department of Biology, MIT, Cambridge, MA; 2) Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA; 3) Mathematics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA; 4) Bioengineering, Developmental Biology, and Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA.

136 - 4:30
Endocytosis drives junctional and cytoskeletal protein redistribution to promote rapid embryonic wound repair. Miranda V. Hunter1, Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez1,2,3. 1) Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 2) Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3) Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

137 - 4:45
Dunk stabilizes the tensile actomyosin network at the leading edge of the cleavage furrows during Drosophila cellularization. Bing He1, Adam Martin2, Eric Wieschaus1,3. 1) Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 2) Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA; 3) HHMI, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

138 - 5:00
A Balance between Arf and Rho1 G Protein Pathways Patterns the Early Drosophila Embryo. Donghoon Lee, Tony Harris. Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

139 - 5:15
Cellular Mechanisms of Heart Morphogenesis and Lumen Formation in Drosophila. Georg Vogler1, Jiandong Liu3, Timothy W. Iafe4, Ede Migh2, József Mihály2, Rolf Bodmer1. 1) Development and Aging, Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute, La Jolla, CA; 2) Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Genetics, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary; 3) Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and McAllister Heart Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; 4) New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016.

140 - 5:30
Myosin light chain phosphatase regulates actomyosin contractility in the Drosophila follicular epithelium. M. D. Martin-Bermudo1, I. Grosheva1, D. Gómez-Mígues2. 1) Dept Developmental Biol, CSIC, Seville, Spain; 2) 2Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

141 - 5:45
Coordinated cell area contractions drive the formation of new cell contacts in germband extension. Deqing Kong1, Lars Reichl2, Yujun Zhang1, Fred Wolf2, Jörg Groβhans1. 1) Institute for Developmental Biochemistry, Medical School, University of Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen, Germany; 2) Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Am Faβberg, 37077 Göttingen, Germany.


Saturday, March 7   4:00 PM–6:00 PM

Stem Cells


Co-Moderators: Todd Nystul, University of California, San Francisco and Tony Ip, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester

Room: Chicago 6/7

142 - 4:00
Neuroblasts build their own adhesive daughter cell niche through activation of PI3-Kinase signaling. Sarah Siegrist, Susan Doyle, Matthew Pahl. Biology Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

143 - 4:15
The conserved Misshapen-Warts-Yorkie pathway acts in the epithelial niche to regulate intestinal stem cell division. Qi Li1, Shuangxi Li2, Sebastian Mana-Capelli3, Rachel J. Roth Flach1, Laura V. Danai1, Alla Amcheslavsky1, Yingchao Nie1, Satoshi Kaneko1, Xiaohao Yao1, Xiaochu Chen1, Jennifer L. Cotton4, Junhao Mao4, Dannel McCollum3, Jin Jiang2, Michael P. Czech1, Lan Xu1, Tony Ip1. 1) Molecular Medicine, UMass medical school, Worcester, MA; 2) Department of Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; 3) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, UMass medical school, Worcester, MA; 4) Department of Cancer Biology, UMass medical school, Worcester, MA.

144 - 4:30
Cell fate determination in intestinal stem cell progeny. Jérémy Sallé, Allison Bardin. Institut Curie, Paris, France.

145 - 4:45
Septate Junction Proteins are Required in the Testis Niche for Stem Cell Differentiation. Cameron Berry, Jaclyn Lim, Margaret Fuller. Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA.

146 - 5:00
The tumor suppressor homolog Rbf maintains hub cell quiescence and identity, and prevents ectopic niche formation. Leah Greenspan, Erika Matunis. Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205.

147 - 5:15
A somatic permeability barrier around the germline is essential for Drosophila spermatogenesis. Michael Fairchild, Christopher Smendziuk, Guy Tanentzapf. Cell and Developmental Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

148 - 5:30
c-Fos targeting by the Piwi-piRNA pathway regulates Drosophila ovarian germline. Jonathon D. Klein1, Chunxu Qu2, Chunlao Tang2, Jamy C. Peng1. 1) Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; 2) Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN.

149 - 5:45
Role of non-coding RNAs in stem cell regulation. Megha Ghildiyal1,3, Blaise Li2, Hervé Seitz2, Allan Spradling1,3. 1) Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Baltimore, MD, 21210, USA; 2) Institute of Human Genetics, CNRS UPR 1142, Montpellier, France; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.


Saturday, March 7   4:00 PM–6:00 PM

Immunity and Pathogenesis (4 talks) and Physiology, Organismal Growth and Aging II
(4 talks) This session made possible in part by generous support from Division of Aging Biology at National Institute on Aging


Co-Moderators: Neal Silverman, University of Massachusetts, Medical School, Worcester and Nicolas Buchon, Cornell University, Ithaca NY and Joanna Chiu, University of California Davis

Room: Chicago 8-10

150 - 4:00
Genome wide transcriptional analysis of Drosophila larvae towards entomopathogenic nematodes. Md. Badrul Arefin1, Lucie Kučerová1, Pavel Dobeš2, Pavel Hyršl2, Michal Žurovec3, Ulrich Theopold1. 1) Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, University of Stockholm, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden; 2) Department of Animal Physiology and Immunology, Institute of Experimental Biology, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno, Czech Republic; 3) Biology Centre of the AS CR, Institute of Entomology, Branišovská 1160/31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.

151 - 4:15
Investigating the immune function of the Drosophila melanogaster MACPF protein Torso-like. L. J. Forbes Beadle1, T. Crossman1, J. C. Whisstock2, C. G. Warr1. 1) School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 Australia; 2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 Australia.

152 - 4:30
The acetate switch of an intestinal pathogen disrupts host insulin signaling and lipid metabolism. S. Hang1, A. Purdy1, W. Robins2, Z. Wang1, M. Mandal1, S. Chang1, J. Mekalanos2, P. Watnick1. 1) Division of infectious Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; 2) Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

153 - 4:45
Armadillo modulates intracellular titers of Wolbachia bacteria in Drosophila gonads. Ajit Kamath, Michelle Toomey, Rama Krishna Simhadri, Horacio Frydman. Biology, Boston University, Boston, MA.

154 - 5:00
Preventing age-related metaplasia promotes homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract and extends lifespan. Hongjie Li1,2, Yanyan Qi1, Heinrich Jasper1. 1) Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA; 2) University of Rochester, Biology Department, Rochester, NY.

155 - 5:15
Regulation of metabolism and insulin sensitivity by Sir2 in Drosophila. Rebecca A. S. Palu, Carl S. Thummel. Human Genetics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.

156 - 5:30
Systemic organ wasting induced by localized expression of the secreted insulin/IGF antagonist ImpL2. Young Kwon1, Wei Song1, Ilia Droujinine1, Yanhui Hu1, John Asara3,4, Norbert Perrimon1,2. 1) Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 3) Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 4) Division of Signal Transduction, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.

157 - 5:45
Mechanism of Body Fat Regulation by Split ends. Kelsey Jensen, Tânia Reis. Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Medical School, Aurora, CO.


Sunday, March 8   8:30 AM–12:00 NOON

Plenary Session II


Moderator: Michael Eisen, HHMI & University of California, Berkeley

Room: Sheraton/Chicago Center

Presentations:

8:30 am   Poster Awards Presentation. Ilaria Rebay. University of Chicago, IL.

8:35 am   How Zelda Promotes Enhancer Activity During Zygotic Genome Activation. C. Rushlow1, Y. Sun1, C.-Y. Nien1, SM. Foo1, H.-Y. Liu1, K. Chen2, J. Zeitlinger2. 1) Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY; 2) Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO.

9:05 am   Asymmetric Stem Cell Division in Drosophila Testis. Yukiko Yamashita1,2. 1) Ctr Stem Cell Biol, Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

9:35 am   Mechanisms and Functions of RNA Silencing Pathways. Phillip Zamore. RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605.

10:05 am - Break

10:30 am   Control of Proliferative and Immune Homeostasis in the Aging Intestine. Heinrich Jasper. Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA.

11:00 am   Decapentaplegic and the Control of Growth in the Drosophila Wing Imaginal Disc. Matthew Gibson, Takuya Akiyama. Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 USA.

11:30 am   Flies and Alcohol: Interplay of Nature and Nurture. Ulrike Heberlein1, Ulrike Heberlein, past and current lab members2. 1) HHMI/Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA; 2) University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.