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Important Dates:

 
September 24, 2014
Abstract Submission Opens

Conference Registration Opens

 
November 5, 2014
Deadline for Workshop Requests
 
November 10, 2014
Abstract Submission Deadline
 
December 1, 2014
Larry Sandler Award Submission Deadline
 
January 16, 2015
Deadline for Early (Discounted) Conference Registration
 
February 6, 2015
Deadline for Hotel Reservations
 

 

2015 Meeting Organizers:

 

Greg Beitel
Michael Eisen
Marc Freeman
Ilaria Rebay
 

Workshops

 

WORKSHOPS

Individuals who wished to organize a workshop at the Annual Drosophila Research Conference submitted an application.  The applications were reviewed and selected by the Conference Organizers and scheduled accordingly.  Workshop organizers developed their own program.

 


Wednesday, March 4   12:00 NOON–6:00 PM
Ecdysone Workshop


Room:

Chicago 8

Organizers:

Laurie von Kalm, University of Central Florida , and
Nick Sokal, Indiana University

The Ecdysone Workshop welcomes all those interested in insect endocrinology. Importantly, this workshop is a forum to discuss the role of different hormones (e.g., 20-hydroxyecdysone, juvenile hormone, peptide hormones, insulin) and the crosstalk between their signaling pathways. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, hormone synthesis and secretion, and hormonal control of transcription, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, metabolism, timing and behavior. Platform talks of 15 minutes will be selected from interested applicants and grouped into sessions, with each session highlighted by an invited speaker. To apply and/or receive the final program, please email the organizers. Laurie von Kalm, University of Central Florida (lvonkalm@ucf.edu), Nick Sokal, Indiana University (nsokol@indiana.edu)


Friday, March 6   1:30 PM–4:00 PM
Plenary Session and Workshop for Undergraduate Researchers


Room:

Missouri

Organizers:

Alexis Nagengast, Widener University, Chester, PA, and
Beth Ruedi, Genetics Society of America, Bethesda, MD

Undergraduate conference attendees will attend an �Undergraduate Plenary Session� from 1:30-2:45 pm, with two talks presented at a level appropriate for an undergraduate audience. From 3:00-4:00 pm, undergraduates will have a chance to talk to a panel of graduate students about applications, interviewing, admission, choosing a lab, and quality of life in graduate school.


Friday, March 6   1:45 PM–3:45 PM
Communicating Your Drosophila Research to Scientific and Non-scientific Audiences


Room:

Michigan A/B

Organizers:

Joyce Fernandes, Miami University, Oxford, OH, and
Raeka Aiyar, Genetics Society of America, Bethesda, MD, and
Andreas Prokop, The University of Manchester, UK

This workshop will focus on science communication. First, we will discuss its importance for our research productivity, explaining relevant communication skills and how they can improve our publications, grant applications, presentations, to effectively communicate relevance of the research. We will then explain Drosophila-specific strategies for science communication, providing examples from University, lay audience and school contexts. It will become clear how science communication can improve our own research and the use of our model organism Drosophila, its recognition by non-fly researchers and the general public, and even science teaching at schools. There will be ample opportunity for discussion.

 

 Raeka Aiyar, Genetics Society of America and Joyce Fernandes, Miami University - Communication Skills for Scientists: Tailoring your research message
Isabel M. Palacios, University of Cambridge, UK - Building an African Drosophila Biomedical Research Community
Andreas Prokop, The University of Manchester, UK - Developing an objective-driven multifaceted strategy for Drosophila outreach and science communication


Friday, March 6   1:45 PM–3:45 PM
Feeding Behavior, Nutrition and Metabolism


Room:

Chicago 8-10

Organizers:

T�nia Reis, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, and
William W. Ja, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA

Drosophila has become as a powerful model system for studying how diet and nutrition can influence a wide range of metabolic processes. This workshop is designed to assemble a diverse group of presentations that highlight recent advances in the field of nutrition and metabolism. The goal of this workshop is to foster discussions and encourage collaborations among individuals interested in topics ranging from food intake as a fundamental parameter of metabolism to the effects of diet on energy storage and utilization.

 

Speakers:

Michael Gordon, University of British Columbia, Canada, Pharyngeal sense organs drive robust sugar consumption in Drosophila.

Pavel Masek, University of Nevada Reno, Neural circuit regulating aversive taste memory in Drosophila.

Megan E. Garlapow, North Carolina State University, Quantitative Genetics of Food Intake in Drosophila melanogaster.

Delanoue, R., Agrawal, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Stunted is a fat body-derived factor that remotely couples insulin secretion with nutrient availability through its receptor Methuselah.

Wei Song, Harvard Medical School, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Enhancement of glucagon-induced hyperglycemia by activin signaling.

Susumu Hirabayashi , MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College London, England, A Drosophila Model Linking Diet-induced Metabolic Dysfunction and Cancer.

William E. Barry, University of Utah School of Medicine, The nuclear receptor dHNF4 regulates a developmental switch towards oxidative phosphorylation and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at the onset of adulthood.




Friday, March 6   1:45 PM–3:45 PM
Integration of Computational Approaches and Big Data to Tackle Systems-Biology Problems in Drosophila and other Model systems


Room:

Sheraton 2

Organizers:

Marc S. Halfon, University at Buffalo-SUNY, and
Molly Duman-Scheel, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend, IN and the University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, and
Alexander Fletcher, Oxford University, England, and
Greg Reeves, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, and
Jeremiah Zartman, University of Notre Dame.

With the rapid advancement of molecular biology and gene editing tools, the concept and rationale of simpler model organisms is being blurred, yet it is clear that Drosophila still has a great deal to offer the scientific community in both fundamental and applied research in many areas for a long time to come. In this workshop, speakers will discuss how computation and big data approaches can employ Drosophila either as a tool or a test bed to break down barriers between individual fields as well as a powerful system that provides the impetus and the means to advance into unexplored intellectual territories. The goal is to provide a forum for investigators working on computational and big data problems to discuss how Drosophila researchers can extend their studies to impact a wide range of both medically and agriculturally relevant questions, learn about available resources and techniques, and form new collaborations.


Friday, March 6   1:45 PM–3:45 PM
Tools for Functional Genomics Analyses


Room:

Sheraton 1

Organizers:

Stephanie Mohr, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and
Norbert Perrimon, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and
Lizabeth Perkins, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

The workshop will focus on online tools for analysis of functional genomics data. We will present functional genomics pipelines that utilize tools developed for the community by our group (DIOPT, COMPLEAT, RSVP, etc.) and others (DAVID, Cytoscape etc.). We will emphasize tools relevant to analysis of datasets from various types of studies, tools for identifying reagents for large-scale studies, and tools for network representation of data sets, e.g. from in vivo RNAi screens. Attendees will then be able to use the tools to analyze test data, and ask questions, provide feedback, and discuss the need for additional tools and resources.


Friday, March 6   1:45 PM–3:45 PM
Harnessing Community Resources for Drosophila Neuroscience


Room:

Sheraton 3

Organizers:

Cahir O'Kane, University of Cambridge, UK, and
David Osumi-Sutherland, European Bioinformatics Institute, Cambridge, UK

Drosophila allows the dissection of neuronal circuits on a tractable scale, in an organism that exhibits sophisticated behaviour. The emergence of characterized connectome-scale reagent collections and other transgenes to visualise and manipulate neurons underpins advances towards this goal. A major challenge is to integrate these reagents and rich accompanying datasets with each other and the wider literature, while providing public access through efficient text and image-based searches. This workshop will highlight emerging experimental, genetic and informational resources for this purpose, crystallise the needs of the user community, and discuss how reagents and datasets can be made better accessible.

 

Speakers:

Andre Fiala, University of Göttingen, Optical dissection of pre- and postsynaptic plasticity in the Drosophila brain

Marco Gallio, Northwestern University, Dynamic, multi-color labeling of neural connections in Drosophila.

Jim Truman, Janelia Research Center, HHMI, Development of resources for studying the larval CNS

Julie Simpson, Janelia Research Center, HHMI, Drosophila CNS expression reagents.

Andrew Straw, Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, A web app for organizing manually annotated neuroanatomy in Drosophila.

Florian Schülze, VRVis Forschungs GmbH, Vienna, BrainMining - Recent advances in high performance image retrieval methods.

David Osumi-Sutherland, Virtual Fly Brain; European Bioinformatics Institute, Open data integration on Virtual Fly Brain.




Saturday, March 7   6:45 PM–8:45 PM
Diverse Applications of CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering


Room:

Chicago 8-10

Organizers:

Jill Wildonger, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and
Kate O'Connor-Giles, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and
Melissa Harrison, University of Wisconsin, Madison

In the short time since its first application, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has transformed genome engineering in Drosophila. This workshop will detail new advances, highlight successful application of the system to address diverse biological questions, and encourage discussion of methods for further expanding the utility of this technology. Following six 15-minute presentations, a question-and-answer discussion forum will promote a dynamic exchange of information for successfully applying CRISPR technology and ideas on creative strategies for future applications.

 

Speakers:

Kate O'Connor Giles, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Overcoming challenges to efficient CRISPR-based HDR

Hugo Bellen, Baylor College of Medicine, CRISPRing MiMICS: strategy and use

Frank Schnorrer, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, A Versatile Two-Step CRISPR- and RMCE-Based Strategy for Efficient Genome Engineering in Drosophila

Klaus Förstemann, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, PCR-based genome editing in Drosophila S2 cells

David Stern, Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, A few short notes on use of CRISPR-Cas9 in non-melanogaster Drosophila species.



Saturday, March 7   6:45 PM–8:45 PM
Drosophila Research and Pedagogy at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUI)


Room:

Sheraton 1

Organizers:

Josefa Steinhauer, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, and
David Roberts, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA, and
Eric Stoffregen, Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston, ID, and
Rebeccah Kurzhals, Southeast Missouri State University

This workshop provides a platform for presentation and discussion of Drosophila research and pedagogy at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). The goals include: 1) promoting undergraduate research by providing a forum for students to make oral presentations; 2) connecting people interested in research and teaching at a PUI with current PUI faculty; 3) establishing a network among current PUI faculty to promote discussion and collaboration, and to provide support on professional issues that differ from those at large institutions; 4) sharing concepts and techniques that encourage the integration of Drosophila as a teaching tool in the classroom and laboratory.


Saturday, March 7   6:45 PM–8:45 PM
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Sex


Room:

Missouri

Organizers:

Michelle Arbeitman, Florida State University, and
Mark Siegal, New York University, and
Artyom Kopp, University of California, Davis, and
Mark VanDoren, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

The workshop will cover the molecular genetics, development, neurobiology, genomics, evolution, and population genetics of sexual dimorphism, with an emphasis on cross-disciplinary interactions. Presentations by invited speakers and selected abstracts from each discipline will be followed by moderated discussions. The speakers are encouraged to summarize the key ideas behind their research for people working in other fields, outline the main unsolved questions, offer their opinions about future directions, and suggest connections that could be built with other disciplines.


Saturday, March 7   6:45 PM–8:45 PM
Cracking the Cis Regulatory Code: New Computational and Physical Approaches


Room:

Sheraton 2

Organizers:

David Arnosti, Michigan State University, and
Saurabh Sinha, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and
Hernan Garcia, University of California, Berkeley

Because of the complex and redundant nature of cis regulatory information, conventional genomics approaches have yet to crack the DNA regulatory code driving metazoan gene expression. Drosophila affords a uniquely powerful system to uncover the action of complex transcriptional regulation involving proximal and distally acting enhancers, laying the path towards the predictive understanding of developmental programs. This workshop will focus on new approaches from biophysics, computational biology, and mathematical modeling that offer important opportunities to significantly move this field of research forward.

 

Speakers:

 

Alistair Boettiger, Harvard University, Quantitative Single Cell Image Analysis Informs Models of Cis -Regulation

Angela Depace, Harvard Medical School, Higher-order cooperativity and energy dissipation can sharpen gene regulatory functions

Ido Golding, Baylor College of Medicine, Quantifying the Stochastic Kinetics of Gene Regulation

John Reinitz, University of Chicago, From the Drosophilidae to the Sepsidae and back again: Compensatory evolution in a cis-regulatory codon

Michael White, Washington University, Statistical thermodynamic models of Hedgehog/Ci cis-regulatory logic


Saturday, March 7   9:15 PM–11:15 PM
Homologous Recombination Mechanisms and Metrics


Room:

Sheraton 1

Organizers:

Mitch McVey, Tufts University, and
Jeff Sekelsky, University of North Carolina, and
Jan LaRocque, Georgetown University

The goal of this workshop is to promote discussion between researchers working at the interface of recombination, repair, and genome evolution. Major themes will include factors that influence the timing and location of meiotic and mitotic crossovers, chromatin effects on recombination, and systems for measuring recombination.

 

Speakers:

Irene Chiolo, University of Southern California, Heterochromatic breaks move to the nuclear periphery to complete recombinational repair

Lucas Hemmer, Kansas University, Molecular evolution of the synaptonemal complex proteins of Drosophila

Stacie Hughes, Stowers Institute, A new mutation that causes aberrant SC assembly and disassembly in Drosophila oocytes

Corbin Jones, University of North Carolina Computational challenges when dealing with recombination data

Kathryn Kohl, Winthrop University, Mapping of crossovers on chromosome 4

Jan LaRocque, Georgetown University, The effects of aging on homologous recombination repair

Kim McKim, Rutgers University, Cohesins and the regulation of meiotic recombination

Nadia Singh, North Carolina State University, Phenotypic plasticity in meiotic recombination rate




Saturday, March 7   9:15 PM–11:15 PM
Developmental Mechanics


Room:

Sheraton 2

Organizers:

Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez, University of Toronto, and
Guy Tanentzapf, University of British Columbia

D’Arcy Thompson in his seminal book On growth and form proposed that physical forces play a central role in animal development. Over the last twenty years, the establishment of tools to measure and manipulate mechanical forces in living organisms has demonstrated that indeed mechanical forces influence molecular dynamics and cell behaviors during tissue morphogenesis. In this workshop, we will review the most recent technical advances to visualize and quantify force generation during Drosophila development, and we will discuss the latest results demonstrating the interplay between physical forces, molecular dynamics and tissue morphogenesis.

 

Speakers:

Sally Horne-Badovinac, University of Chicago, An unexpected role for an ovarian muscle tissue in shaping the fly egg.

Barry Thompson, London Research Institute, Genetic control of global force patterns shaping the fly wing during pupal development.

Mark Peifer, University of North Carolina, Cytoskeletal Regulation From Molecules to Morphogenesis.

Sergio Simoes, University of Toronto, Dynamics and function of actomyosin and apical endocytosis during junctional disassembly in epithelial to mesenchymal transitions.

Laura Nilson, McGill University, Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the homophilic adhesion molecule Echinoid.

Frank Schnorrer, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Forces during Drosophila flight muscle building.

Halyna Scherbata, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Different modes of miRNA-based regulation of Drosophila ECM receptor Dystroglycan.




Saturday, March 7   9:15 PM–11:15 PM
New Tools and Approaches for Behavioral Phenotyping in Drosophila


Room:

Sheraton 3

Organizers:

Pavel M Itskov, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon, Portugal, and
Giorgio F Gillestro, Imperial College London, UK, and
Carlos Ribeiro, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown

Analyzing behavior and interpreting behavioral data can be a tedious, complicated and intimidating task for non experts. The workshop will focus on state-of-the-art behavioral phenotyping tools that have been created for the broader Drosophila community. The aim is to introduce recent advances and to foster new collaborations. The workshop will emphasize automated unbiased approaches using open source technologies enabling next generation high-throughput behavioral screening. The workshop will include, but will not be limited to, the following topics: video tracking and automated classification of adult and larval behavior, automated methods to monitor feeding behavior, circadian activity and sleep.

 

Speakers:

Pavel M Itskov,  Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, flyPAD: an automated open platform for high throughput monitoring, analysis and modification of feeding behavior in Drosophila.

Benjamin de Bivort, Harvard University, Navigating the resolution-throughput tradeoff to capture individual behavior.

Marta Zlatic, Janelia Farm Research Campus, A neuron behavior map of the Drosophila larval nervous system.

Gordon J Berman, Princeton University, Mapping the structure of Drosophila behavior.

Andrew D. Straw, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP), Targeted optogenetics and thermogenetics in freely moving Drosophila using FlyMAD.

Giorgio F Gillestro, Imperial College London, Using open source software and hardware to monitor and interfere with behavior.