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2014 Important Dates

Abstract Submission Opens March 21
Conference Registration Opens March 28
Travel Award Application April 24
Abstract Submission Deadline April 24
DeadlineAbstract Revision Deadline April 25
Microphone Runner Application Deadline April 26
Platform/Poster Assignments Online June 8
Abstract Search and Program Planner Online June 25
Early Meeting Registration June 26
Housing Reservation June 26

Poster Session Listing

 

 

POSTER SESSIONS

Cell Biology: Cell Cycle/Growth Control/Metabolism

70A
Understanding the regulation of motor proteins in cdc15-2 cells recovering from spindle damage. Beryl Augustine, Foong May Yeong. Dept of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

71B
Physiological impact of NAD(P)HX accumulation in yeast. Julia Becker-Kettern, Paul P. Jung, Carole L. Linster. Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), University of Luxembourg, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg.

72C
A cell separation checkpoint ensures proper order of late cytokinetic events. Jennifer L. Brace, Matthew Doerfler, Eric L. Weiss. Molecular Biosciences, Northwestern Univ, Evanston, IL.

73A
Respiro-fermentative differentiation in yeast colonies. Michal Cap1, Libuse Vachova2, Zdena Palkova1. 1) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, 128 44 Prague, Czech Republic; 2) Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

74B
Cell Cycle Regulation of Endocytic Vesicle Scission Apparatus during Mitotic Exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kaiquan Tan, Cheen Fei Chin, Foong May Yeong. Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

75C
The metabolic response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yachen Dong, Zhihua Jiao, Jin Cai, Ruosi Fang, Qihe Chen. Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

76A
A genetic selection to identify new components of the S. cerevisiae RAM network. S. Edwards, J. Jansen, J. Brace, E. Weiss. Molecular Biosciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

77B
Quantifying Condition-Dependent Intracellular Protein Levels Enables High-Precision Fitness Estimates. Kerry A. Geiler-Samerotte1, Tatsu Hashimoto3, Mike Dion4, Bogdan Budnik4, Edo Airoldi3, D. Allan Drummond2. 1) Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, New York University, New York, NY; 2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA; 3) Department of Statistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA; 4) FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

78C
Parsing the many possible physiological roles of trehalose in yeast. P. Gibney, A. Schieler, J. Chen, Y. Xu, J. Rabinowitz, D. Botstein. Lewis-Sigler Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

79A
Global analysis of molecular fluctuations associated with cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. B. Grys1, H. Friesen1, O. Kraus2, B. J. Frey2, C. Boone1, B. J. Andrews1. 1) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

80B
Untargeted metabolomics reveals the rate of secondary mutations causing metabolic phenotypes. Julia A. Hanchard1,2, Adam P. Rosebrock2, Amy A. Caudy1,2. 1) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

81C
Functions of genes typical of structured colony morphology. Otakar Hlavacek1, Vratislav Stovicek2, Libuse Vachova1, Zdena Palkova2. 1) Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Microbiology, ASCR, v.v.i., 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic; 2) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, 128 44 Prague 2, Czech Republic.

82A
Investigating the role of CDK-mediated phosphorylation of the bud neck-localized proteins Bud3 and Bni4. Jennifer K. Hood-DeGrenier, Bharat Hans, Angeline Cloutier, Alyssa Geddis, Hanh Nguyen. Biology Department, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA.

83B
SUN Family Proteins Sun4p, Uth1p and Sim1p are efficiently secreted out of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and regulated differently during development of yeast cultures. Evgeny Kuznetsov1, Helena Kucerova2, Zdena Palkova1, Libuse Vachova2. 1) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic; 2) Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR.

84C
The Npr2 complex regulates a metabolic switch that controls TORC1 dependent proliferation during amino acid limited growth. Sunil Laxman, Benjamin Sutter, Lei Shi, Benjamin Tu. Biochemistry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

85A
Role for alkaline ceramidase and its products sphingoid bases in the oxidative stress response. Jae Kyo Yi, Ruijuan Xu, EunMi Jeong, Cungui Mao. The Department of Medicine and Cancer Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

86B
The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia. Evandro A. De-Souza, Felipe S. A. Pimentel, Caio M. Machado, Larissa S. Martins, Wagner S. da-Silva, Mónica Montero-Lomelí, Claudio A. Masuda. Instituto de Bioquímica Médica Leopoldo de Meis, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

87C
Measurement of thiamine vitamers and ethanol/CO2 in C. glabrata. Erin M. Neal, Christine L. Kerwin-Iosue, Dennis Wykoff. Biology Department, Villanova University, Villanova, PA.

88A
Identification of regulators of riboneogenesis by high-throughput metabolomic and expression screens. Yoomi Oh1,2, Adam Rosebrock1, Amy Caudy1,2. 1) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

89B
The fourth function of the cell wall. Hiroki Okada, Shinsuke Ohnuki, Yoshikazu Ohya. Integrated Biosciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan.

90C
Roles of four putative Cyk3-binding proteins in coordination of cleavage-furrow ingression and abscission during cytokinesis. Masayuki Onishi, Meng Wang, John Pringle. Dept Gen, Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA.

91A
Contribution of metabolic adaptation and chronological aging to cell differentiation within yeast colonies. Zdena Palkova1, Libuse Vachova2, Michal Cap1, Marcela Hejlova2. 1) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Charles University in Prague, 128 44 Prague 2, Czech Republic, zdenap@natur.cuni.cz; 2) Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

92B
Roles of FMS1 (orf19.4589) and CBP1 (orf19.7323) genes in the de novo beta-alanine synthesis pathway from polyamines in Candida albicans. Ruvini U. Pathirana1, Dhammika H. M. L. P. Navarathna2, Kenneth W. Nickerson1. 1) School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE; 2) Laboratory of Pathology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

93C
Revisiting the myth of trehalose in the heat shock response: The Tps1 protein, and not trehalose, protected yeast cells from losing viability at high temperature. M. Petitjean, MA. Teste, JM. François, JL. Parrou. Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Systèmes Biologiques et des Procédés, UMR-CNRS5504 & UMR-INRA 792 & INSA & Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France.

94A
Revisiting the role of TPS1 encoding trehalose 6-P synthase in the regulation of yeast glycolysis. M. Petitjean, A. Vax, MA. Teste, JL. Parrou, JM. François. Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Systèmes Biologiques et des Procédés ,UMR-CNRS5504, UMR-INRA 792,INSA, Toulouse, France.

95B
Specific histone residues mediate RTS1 rescue of gcn5Δ growth under stress. Emily L. Petty1,2, Shannon M. Tomlinson1, Anne Lafon3, Bryce Mendelsohn4, Kristofor Webb1, Eric J. Bennett1, Lorraine Pillus1,2. 1) Division of Biological Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA; 2) Moores Cancer Center Institute, UCSD, La Jolla, CA; 3) Institut Curie, Paris; 4) Department of Pediatrics, Division of Medical Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, CA.

96C
Characterization of double budding in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Angela L. Piotrowski, Robert M. Seiser. Roosevelt University, Schaumburg, IL.

97A
Ubiquitylation may promote the Glc7 activity opposing Ipl1 kinase during mitosis. R. Ravindran1, P. Polk2, L. C. Robinson1, K. Tatchell1. 1) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, LSUHSC, Shreveport, LA; 2) Research Core Facility, LSUHSC, Shreveport, LA.

98B
The efflux pump MlcE from the Penicillium solitum compactin biosynthetic gene cluster increases Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to natural statins. Ana Rems, Rasmus John Normand Frandsen. DTU Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.

99C
Determining the adaptive landscape of the SUL1 promoter. Matthew S. Rich1, Celia Payen1, Maitreya J. Dunham1, Stanley Fields1,2,3. 1) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

100A
Physiological role of nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the regulation of sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kyohei Saiki, Akira Nishimura, Iwao Ohtsu, Daisuke Watanabe, Hiroshi Takagi. NAIST, Nara, Japan.

101B
New insights into glucose sensing by S. cerevisiae. Kobi Simpson-Lavy, Mark Johnston. Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, CU-Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, 80045.

102C
A minimal glycolytic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. D. Solis-Escalante1, N. Barrajón Simancas1, N. G. Kuijpers1, J. T. Pronk1,2, JM. Daran1,2, P. Daran-Lapujade1. 1) Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands; 2) Platform Green Synthetic Biology, Delft, The Netherlands.

103A
Improvement of ethanol stress tolerance in an industrial fuel-ethanol Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. A. Bucker, J. C. do Espirito-Santo, G. Muller, M. G. Dario, B. U. Stambuk. Dept Biochemistry, Univ Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.

104B
Feral strains forming biofilm colonies are derived from domesticated strains under stress conditions. Libuse Vachova1, Zdena Palkova2, Vratislav Stovicek2, Marketa Begany1. 1) Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic, vachova@biomed.cas.cz; 2) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Charles University in Prague, 128 44 Prague 2, Czech Republic.

105C
Identification of yeast Greatwall kinase Rim15p as a novel negative regulator for alcoholic fermentation. Daisuke Watanabe1,2, Yan Zhou2, Aiko Hirata3, Yoshikazu Ohya3, Takeshi Akao2, Hitoshi Shimoi2, Hiroshi Takagi1. 1) NAIST, Nara, Japan; 2) NRIB, Hiroshima, Japan; 3) University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan.

106A
Re-inventing central carbon metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high-volume production of farnesene. Kati Wu, Kristy Hawkins, Yoseph Tsegaye, Adam Meadows, Lauren Pickens, Anna Tai, Tina Mahatdejkul-Meadows, Eugene Antipov, Madhukar Dasika, Lan Xu, Lily Chao, Savita Ganesan, Jefferson Lai, Patrick Westfall, Timothy Gardner, Annie Tsong. Amyris Inc., Emeryville, CA.

107B
An “oncometabolite” in yeast: 2-hydroxyglutarate accumulates in response to altered mitochondrial and central carbon metabolism. Olga Zaslaver1,2, Adam Rosebrock1, Amy Caudy1,2. 1) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.


Cell Biology: Cytoskeleton

108C
Linker scanning mutagenesis of microtubule nucleating components Spc97 and Spc98. Kimberly Fong1, Jerry Tien1, Celia Payen2, Alex Zelter1, Beth Graczyk1, Maitreya Dunham2, Trisha Davis1. 1) Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

109A
Regulation of the kinetochore localization and activity of the protein kinase Mps1 during mitosis. Lori Koch1,2, Sue Biggins2. 1) Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

110B
Kinetochores require oligomerization of the Dam1 complex to maintain microtubule attachments against tension during biorientation. Neil Umbreit1, Matthew Miller2, Jérôme Cattin-Ortolá1, Jerry Tien1, Charles Asbury3, Trisha Davis1. 1) Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3) Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, WA.

111C
Quality Control of Higher-order Septin Assembly: Mapping the Septin Proteostasis Network in vivo. Andrew Weems, Michael McMurray. Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.

112A
Crosslinking analysis identifies hundreds of distance constraints in protein complexes. Alex Zelter1, Michael Hoopman2, Richard Johnson3, Michael MacCoss3, Robert Moritz2, Trisha Davis1. 1) Department of Biochemistry University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA; 3) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.


Cell Biology: Mating/Sporulation/Meiosis

113B
Regulation of the Ndc80 complex during meiosis in budding yeast. Jingxun Chen1, Angelika Amon2, Elcin Unal1. 1) Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; 2) Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

114C
To What Extent Does Homologous Chromosome Pairing Depend on Recombination-Independent Chromosome Interactions? S. Cheng, A. MacQueen. Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT.

115A
Regulation of nuclear shape in response to mating pheromone. Alison Walters, Emma Dauster, Orna Cohen-Fix. NIDDK/NIH, LCMB, Bethesda, MD.

116B
Developmentally-programmed mega-autophagy drives mother cell demise during yeast gametogenesis. Michael Eastwood, Marc Meneghini. Moleular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

117C
Role of CWI-pathway and Rlm1 transcription factor in colony sporulation patterns. Sarah Piccirillo, Rita Morales, Melissa G. White, Keston Smith, Saul M. Honigberg. Cell Biol/Biophysics, School Biol Sciences, Univ Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO.

118A
Mating and mating-type determination in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. H. Hoshida, S. Murashige, S. Tokuda, R. Akada. Dept Appl Mol Biosci, Yamaguchi Univ, Ube, Yamaguchi, Japan.

119B
dHJ-C, a Tool for Genome-Wide Mapping of Homologous Recombination and Template Choice During Yeast Meiosis. Neil A. Humphryes, Tovah Markowitz, Xiaoji Sun, Viji Subramanian, Andreas Hochwagen. Biology, NYU, NYC, NY.

120C
Translational regulation determines gene insulation during yeast meiosis. Liang Jin, Rolf Sternglanz, Aaron Neiman. Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

121A
Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yona Kassir1, Smadar Kahana-Edwin2, Michal Stark1. 1) Dept Biol, Technion Inst, Haifa, Israel; 2) Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel 52621.

122B
Schizosaccharomyces japonicus provides the second example where chirality of DNA strands causes sister-sister cells developmental asymmetry. Amar J. S. Klar. Gene Reg & Chromosome Biol Lab, NCI-Frederick Cancer Res Fac, Frederick, MD.

123C
A mating pathway deficiency as a reproductive barrier between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Camille Meslin1, Allyson O'Donnell2, Nathan Clark1. 1) Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; 2) Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, PA.

124A
A developmental stage-specific Vps13 complex regulates phsophatidylinositol-4-phosphate pools. Jae-Sook Park, Aaron Neiman. Biochem & Cell Biol, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY.

125B
SPS1 and SPO77 act together to regulate prospore membrane closure during sporulation in S. cerevisiae. Scott Paulissen, Christian Slubowski, Linda Huang. Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA.

126C
Characterizing the function of Kar5p during inner nuclear membrane fusion during yeast mating. Jason V. Rogers, Mark D. Rose. Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

127A
Quantification of Meiotic Chromosome Missegregation Frequency in Natural Isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Amy Carol Sirr, Gareth Cromie, Aimée Dudley. Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Inst, Seattle, WA.

128B
Kel1p collaborates with Fus2p for yeast cell fusion. Jean Smith, Richard Stein, Mark Rose. Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

129C
KAR4 has separable functions in mating and multiple steps of meiosis. Abigail J. Sporer, Mark D. Rose. Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

130A Unprogrammed presentation number

131B
Investigating the roles of alternate and short ORFs in meiosis. Kelsey Van Dalfsen, Gloria Brar. Molecular and Cell Biology, UC-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.


Cell Biology: Mitochrondria/Vacuoles/Peroxisomes

132C
Mitochondrial ribosome function/assembly: Regulation by accessory factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kaustuv Datta, Jaswinder Kaur, Dharmendra Pandey. Department of Genetics , University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi, India.

133A
PEP3 overexpression protects yeast from acid stress by promoting vacuolar biogenesis. J. Ding1,2, G. Holzwarth2, S. Bradford3, B. Cooley4, A. Yoshinaga5, J. Patton-Vogt4, H. Abeliovich6, M. Penner2, A. Bakalinsky1,2. 1) Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 2) Department of Food Science & Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3) Environmental & Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 4) Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5) Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 6) Department of Biochemistry and Food Science, Hebrew University, Rehovot, Israel.

134B
Ysp1 homologous proteins participate in responses to membrane stress in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Vladimir Sirotkin1, Michael James1, Elizabeth Bonarigo2, Gary Franke2, Kelly Hopkins2, Scott Erdman1,2. 1) Dept of Cell and Developmental Biology, SUNY Upstate School of Medicine, Syracuse, NY; 2) Dept Biol, Syracuse Univ, Syracuse, NY.

135C
Elucidation of the Mitochondrial Protein-Protein Interaction Network. Matthew G. M. Jessulat1, Hiroyuki Aoki1, Zoran Minic1, James Vlasblom2, Sadhna Phanse1,3, Zhaolei Zhang3, Jodi Nunnari4, Mohan Babu1. 1) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2) Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; 3) Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Donnelly Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4) Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California Davis, California, USA.

136A
Aconitase-MRPL49 fusion protein regulates mitochondrial translation in S. pombe. Soo-Jin Jung, Youngdae Seo, Jung-Hye Roe. Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

137B
MTG3, a putative GTPase that regulates mitochondrial ribosome function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Upasana Mehra, Yash Verma, Kaustuv Datta. Department of Genetics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India.

138C
A genetic screen for suppressors of the age-associated decline of mitochondrial membrane potential. NH Thayer1,2, MA Borden1, AL Hughes1,3, D. Lindstrom1, FS Vizeacoumar4, C. Boone4, DE Gottschling1. 1) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) Current Location: Biological Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; 4) University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.

139A
A sterol-enriched vacuolar microdomain mediates the stationary phase lipophagy in budding yeast. Yu-Hsuan Miao, Yi-Shun Chang, Chao-Wen Wang. Inst Plant & Microbial Biol, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.

140B
Membrane insertion mechanisms of mitochondrially-encoded proteins by the Oxa1 homolog, Cox18. Mei-Yi Zheng, Heather L. Fiumera. Dept. of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY.


Cell Biology: Protein Sorting and Turnover

141C
Specific α-arrestins negatively regulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response by down-modulating the G-protein coupled receptor Ste2. Christopher Alvaro1, Allyson O'Donnell2, Ann Aindow1, Derek Prosser3, Andrew Augustine2, Aaron Goldman4, Jeff Brodsky2, Martha Cyert4, Beverly Wendland3, Jeremy Thorner1. 1) Div. of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology, Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA; 2) Dept. of Cell Biology, Sch. of Med., Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; 3) Dept. of Biology, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD; 4) Dept. of Biology, Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA.

142A
Stress conditions promote Gap1 permease ubiquitylation and downregulation via the arrestin-like Bul and Aly proteins. M. Crapeau, A. Merhi, B. Andre. IBMM, Free University of Brussels, Gosselies, Belgium.

143B
The protein quality control machinery regulates its misassembled proteasome subunits, and distinguishes them from proteasome storage granules. S. Ben-Aroya, L. Peters, O. Yogev, R. Hazan. Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

144C
Cdc48-Shp1 chaperone promotes structural integrity of protein phosphatase 1 holoenzyme. You-Liang Cheng1,2, Rey-Huei Chen1. 1) Institute of Molecular Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 2) Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.

145A
The Yeast Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelle (BLOC) Complex interacts with ESCRT to regulate endosomal trafficking. Lauren E. Dalton1, Matthew Jessulat2, Viktor Deineko2, Jeffery Tong1, Mohan Babu2, Elizabeth Conibear1. 1) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2) Department of Biochemistry, Research and Innovation Centre, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

146B
Identifying new protein trafficking networks using evolutionary rate covariation (ERC). Zelia A. Ferreira1, Allyson F. O'Donnell2, Nathan L. Clark1. 1) Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh, 15260, Pittsburgh, PA; 2) Dept. of Cell Biology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, 15260, Pittsburgh, PA.

147C
Hsp31 is a Stress-response Chaperone that Prevents α-Synuclein Aggregation. Chai-jui Tsai1, Kiran Aslam1, Holli Drendel2, Josephat Asiago1, Kourtney Fultz1, Jean-Christophe Rochet1, Tony Hazbun1. 1) Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; 2) Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

148A
Degeneracy of parameters underlying partitioning of macromolecular content upon yeast cell division. Ali Kinkhabwala2, Anton Khmelinskii1, Michael Knop1. 1) ZMBH, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2) Max Planck Institut of molecular Physiology, Dortmund, Germany.

149B
Vps13 plays a role at the early and late endosomes. Kathleen L. Kolehmainen1,2, Elizabeth Conibear2. 1) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

150C
Dissecting natural variation in yeast to identify genetic modifiers of protein aggregation. Theodore W. Peters, Christopher S. Nelson, Akos A. Grencser, Kathleen J. Dumas, Gordon J. Lithgow, Rachel B. Brem, Robert E. Hughes. Buck Institute for Research on Aging Novato, CA.

151A
Impairment of translocon-associated protein degradation under conditions of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Eric M. Rubenstein1, Mark Hochstrasser2. 1) Department of Biology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN; 2) Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

152B
Substrate-induced ubiquitylation and endocytosis of Gap1 and Can1 permeases: role of arrestin-like proteins. Elie Saliba1, Kassem Ghaddar1, Ahmad Merhi1, Eva-Maria Krammer2, Martine Prévost2, Bruno André1. 1) Molecular Physiology of the Cell, Université Libre de Bruxelles, IBMM, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium; 2) Structure and Function of Biological Membranes, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, 1050 Brussels, Belgium.

153C
Mitochondrial dynamics and the selectivity of mitophagic processes. Kobi J. Simpson-Lavy, Hagai Abeliovich. Department of Biochemistry and Food Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.

154A
A direct role of HRD3 in ER associated degradation (ERAD). Nidhi Vashistha1, Sarah Carroll2, Randolph Hampton1. 1) Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA; 2) University of Washington, Seattle,WA.

155B
The alternate clathrin adaptor complex subunit Apm2 works with Ima1p in a distinct protein transport pathway. Shawn T. Whitfield1,2, Helen E. Burston2, Nandini Raghuram2, Elizabeth Conibear2. 1) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.


Cell Biology: Signal Transduction

156C
Non-Preferred Carbon Source Utilization Induces Snf1p- and ER Stress-Dependent Activation of the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) Pathway. Hema Adhikari, Paul Cullen. Department of Biological Sciences at SUNY-Buffalo, NY 14260-1300.

157A
ER Stress Stimulates Mucin Receptor Signaling From the Secretory Pathway. Hema Adhikari1, Nadia Vadaie1, Jacky Chow1, Christopher Stefan2, Jason MacGurn2, Paul Cullen1. 1) Department of Biological Sciences at SUNY-Buffalo, 14260-1300; 2) Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology & Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics Cornell University Ithaca NY 14853-7202.

158B
Quantifying the effect of coding sequence variation in human orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bim1 on the pheromone response. D. Britain1,2,3, B. Sands1, W. Peria1, G. Pesce4, R. Brent1,2,5. 1) Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 4) The Molecular Sciences Institute, Berkeley, CA; 5) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

159C
Global Analysis of Filamentous Growth Pathway Regulators in Yeast. Colin A. Chavel, Lauren M. Caccamise, Boyang Li, Paul J. Cullen. University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, NY.

160A
Structure and function of the TORC1-PKA signaling network in budding yeast. James Hughes Hallett, Joe Kunkel, Xiangxia Luo, Andrew Capaldi. University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

161B
The Cdc42-Interacting Protein Bem4 Regulates the Filamentous Growth Pathway. Colin A. Chavel1, Andrew Pitoniak1, Jeremy Smith1, Diawoye Camera1, Jacky Chow1, Sheelarani Karunanithi1, Ken Wolfe2, Paul Cullen1. 1) University at Buffalo, SUNY, 337 Cooke Hall, North Campus, Buffalo, NY 14260; 2) Smurfit Institute of Genetics,Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.

162C
Med13p anchors cyclin C in the nucleus to prevent stress-independent mitochondrial fragmentation and stress hypersensitivity. Katrina F. Cooper, Svetlana Khakhina, Chunyan Jin. Dept Molec Biol, Rowan University-SOM, Stratford, NJ.

163A
Tor1 and PKA downregulation in stationary phase rely on Mtl1 to preserve mitochondrial integrity and cell survival. Venkatraghavan Sundaran1, Mima Petkova1, Nuria Pujol-Carrion1, Jordi Boada2, Maria Angeles de la Torre-Ruiz1. 1) Basic Medical Sciences-IRBLleida, University of Lleida, LLEIDA, Spain; 2) Experimental Biology-IRBLleida, University of Lleida, Lleida, Spain.

164B
Calcineurin regulates the yeast synaptojanin Inp53/Sjl3 during membrane stress. Evan Guiney1, Joshua Elias2, Martha Cyert1. 1) Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; 2) Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

165C
TOR Complex 1 is a direct target of amino acid sensor Gcn2. Wenjie Yuan, Yu Jiang. Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Univ Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

166A
Protein-Protein Interactions of the Yak1 Kinase. Adeline Boettcher, Scott Blaszak, Samantha J. DeWerff, Stephen D. Johnston. Department of Biology, North Central College, Naperville, IL.

167B
Endolysosomal membrane trafficking complexes drive nutrient-dependent TORC1 signaling to control cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Joanne M. Kingsbury, Neelam D. Sen, Maria E. Cardenas. Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

168C
Membrane fluidity and temperature sensing are coupled via circuitry comprised of Ole1, Rps5, and Hsf1 in Candida albicans. Michelle Leach1,2, Leah Cowen1. 1) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Aberdeen Fungal Group, University of Aberdeen, Institute of Medical Sciences, Aberdeen, UK.

169A
Regulation of the essential protein kinase Ypk1 by the TORC2 complex. Kristin Leskoske, Françoise Roelants, Jeremy Thorner. Div. of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology, Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3202 USA.

170B
Latency of transcription factor Stp1 depends on a modular regulatory motif that functions as cytoplasmic retention determinant and nuclear degron. Deike J. Omnus, Per O. Ljungdahl. Dept Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Inst, Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.

171C
The phosphorylation state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae signaling proteins varies in a stress-dependent fashion. Matthew MacGilvray1, Anna Larson2, David Berry3, Josh Coon2, Audrey Gasch1. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison , WI; 2) Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 3) Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA.

172A
Substrate sequence specificity and catalytic properties of the signaling Ssy5 endoprotease. Antonio Martins, Per Ljungdahl. Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

173B
TORC1 regulates the yeast lipin Pah1 via the Nem1/Spo7 protein phosphatase complex. Emmanuelle Dubots, Stéphanie Cottier, Marie-Pierre Péli-Gulli, Malika Jaquenoud, Séverine Bontron, Marta Moreno Torres, Roger Schneiter, Claudio De Virgilio. Department of Biology, Unit of Biochemistry, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.

174C
TORC2-dependent Protein Kinase Ypk1 Phosphorylates Ceramide Synthase Components Lag1 and Lac1 to Stimulate Sphingolipid Synthesis. Alexander Muir, Subramaniam Ramachandran, Françoise Roelants, Garrett Timmons, Jeremy Thorner. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

175A
Target of rapamycin-responsiveness on the GATA-family transcription activator Gln3. Rajendra Rai1, Jennifer J. Tate1, Karthik Shanmuganatham2, Martha M. Howe1, Terrance G. Cooper1. 1) Dept. Microbiol., Immunol. and Biochem., Univ. Tennessee, Memphis, TN; 2) Dept. Infectious Disease, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN.

176B
Endocytosis and vacuolar degradation of the yeast cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3. A. Roy, J. H. Kim. Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington , DC.

177C
Functional characterization of protein interactors of Wsc1p and Mid2p stress sensors and PKC1 signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ednalise Santiago-Cartagena1, Vladimir Vélez-Segarra1, Igor Stagljar2, Brian C. Rymond3, José R. Rodriguez-Medina1. 1) Biochemistry, University of Puerto Rico- Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, PR; 2) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Canada; 3) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

178A
Plasma membrane flippase function is required for signaling competence in the mating pheromone response pathway. Elodie A. Sartorel, Evelyne Barrey, Rebecca Lau, Jeremy Thorner. Molecular and cell biology, University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

179B
Role of the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase in the control of the Mig1 transcriptional repressor. Sviatlana Shashkova1, Raul Garcia-Salcedo1, Loubna Bendrioua1, Timo Lubitz2, Niek Welkenhuysen1, Edda Klipp2, Stefan Hohmann1. 1) Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; 2) Theoretical Biophysics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany.

180C
Components of the Vid30 complex participates in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressed genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Angus Ross, Chris Snowdon, Andrew Fletcher, George van der Merwe. Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada.

181A
Dynamics of MAPK signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sarah Weisser1,3, Konstanze Bandmann2,3, Julia van der Felden1,3, Peter Lenz2,3, Hans-Ulrich Mösch1,3. 1) Department of Genetics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Straβe 8, 35043 Marburg, Germany; 2) Department of Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Renthof 6, 35032 Marburg, Germany; 3) LOEWE-Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO), Hans-Meerwein-Straβe, 35043 Marburg.

182B
Glucose derepression via Snf1-Mig1 is controlled at different levels. Niek Welkenhuysen, Tian Ye, Raul Garcia-Salcedo, Stefan Hohmann. Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

183C
Dissecting the role of calcineurin and protein kinase C signalling in Hsp90-dependent caspofungin tolerance. Jinglin L. Xie1, Michelle D. Leach1,2, Leah E. Cowen1. 1) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Aberdeen Fungal Group, School of Medical Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Abderdeen, United Kingdom.

184A
TORC1 and TORC2 regulate Rps6 phosphorylation via Ypk1/2/3 in budding yeast. Seda Yerlikaya1, Madeleine Meusburger1, Alexandre Huber1, Dorothea Anrather2, Gustav Ammerer2, Robbie Loewith1,3. 1) Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 2) Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Dr. Bohrgasse 9, A1030 Vienna, Austria; 3) Swiss National Centre for Competence in Research Programme Chemical Biology, Geneva 1211, Switzerland.

185B
Mechanisms of nitrogen in regulating cAMP signal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Y. Li1, A. Zhang1,2, H. Jin1. 1) Hebei University of Technology, No8 Guangrong Road,Hongqiao District, Tianjin,China; 2) Tianjin University, No92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin, China.

186C
Characterization of the Recruitment of Casein Kinase 1 to P Bodies. Bo Zhang, Khyati Shah, Qian Shi, Paul Herman. Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.


Cell Biology: Other

187A
An overexpression suppressor screen to identify genes that are effectors of nuclear morphology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. James T. Arnone, Orna Cohen-Fix. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, NIDDK/NIH, Bethesda, MD.

188B
A cell biological screen for age dependent changes in lipid metabolic pathways reveals changes in sphingolipid pathways. Anthony O. Beas, Karen L. Zhao, Daniel E. Gottschling. Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

189C
Molecular switches of Golgi size control. Madhura D. Bhave, Prasanna Iyer, Bhawik Jain, Dibyendu Bhattacharyya. Bhattacharyya lab, Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research & Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Sector 22, Navi Mumbai-410 210. MH INDIA.

190A
The osmotolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii possesses two differently regulated glycerol transporters. Michala Bubnová1, Hana Sychrová1, Candida Lucas2. 1) Department of Membrane Transport, Institute of Physiology Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i, Prague, Czech Republic; 2) Departement of Biology, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, Braga, Portugal.

191B
A conserved role for GSK3β in regulating lipid homeostasis through lipins. Leslie J. Chan1,5, Jennifer McQueen1,3,5, Timothy R. Peterson2,5, Meredith Briggs1, David M. Sabatini2,4, Vivien Measday3, Christopher J. R. Loewen1. 1) Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z3, Canada; 2) Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; 3) Wine Research Centre, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z3, Canada; 4) Howard Hughes Medical Institute; 5) These authors contributed equally to this work.

192C
Characterization of Candida glabrata growth and cell wall enzymes in during stress. Yuanyuan Chew, Cheen Fei Chin, Foong May Yeong. Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

193A
The JmjC Domain-containing Regulator Gis1 is Regulated by Levels of Heme and Oxygen Independently. Jonathan M. Comer, Ajit Shah, Sneha Lal, Thai Cao, Jagmohan Hooda, Li Zhang. Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX.

194B
Characterization of the CIA complex in maintaining genome stability. Lilach Emuna, Marina Volpe, Galit David Kadoch, Shay Ben A. roya. Faculty of Life Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

195C
[PSI+], a prion-containing yeast cell, can switch into agar-invasive growth while [psi-] ,a non-prion strain cannot. Irene M. Evans, Ying Peng Lee, Prashanti Patil, Haeja A. Kessler, Dylan S. Weil, Brandy A. Dennis. Irene M. Evans, Rochester Inst Tech, Rochester, NY 14623.

196A
The Role of Phosphorylation in Ribosomal Protein L4. Jesse Michael Fox, Lasse Lindahl. Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

197B
Understanding the role of the translation factor eIF5A through genetic interaction network of different mutants. Fabio C. Galvao1, Sara Sharifpoor2, Danuza Rossi1, PPaulo E. G. Boldrin1, Natalia M. Barboas1, Brenda J. Andrews2, Cleslei F. Zanelli1, Sandro R. Valentini1. 1) Biological Science, UNESP-Univ. Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics, The Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto.

198C
Allele-specific SGA screening to identify functions for ER polarization. Analise K. Hofmann, Andrew K. O. Wong, Christopher J. R. Loewen. 2350 Health Sciences Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver, B. C. Canada V6T 1Z3.

199A
YlSnf1 Affects the Production of Omega-3 Fatty Acids from Yarrowia lipolytica. J. Seip, R. Jackson, H. He, Q. Zhu, S.-P. Hong. Biotechnology, DuPont Central R&D, Wilmington, DE.

200B
PM - ER Membrane Tethering Complexes and Non-vesicular Sterol Transport. Jesper Johansen1, Evan Quon1, Yves Sere2, Anant K. Menon2, Christopher T. Beh1. 1) Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada; 2) Department of Biochemistry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.

201C
Hsp104 as stress indicator in hybrids of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex. Claudia Kempf, Jürgen Wendland. Carlsberg Laboratory, Copenhagen, Denmark.

202A
Roles of the Yap1 Transcription Factor and Antioxidants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae’s Tolerance to Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural, which Function as Thiol-Reactive Electrophiles Generating Oxidative Stress. Daehee Kim, Ji-Sook Hahn. Chemical and Biological engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

203B
A metabolic strategy to enhance long-term survival by Phx1 through stationary phase-specific pyruvate decarboxylases in fission yeast. Eun Jung Kim, Ji Yoon Kim, Jung Hye Roe. School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

204C
Evaluation of cytotoxicity caused by the strong expression of GFPs with various localization signals. R. Kintaka, K. Makanae, H. Moriya. RCIS, Okayama University, City of Okayama, Japan.

205A
Swi3, a novel regulator of aerobic respiration genes and oxygen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sneha Lal, Jagmohan Hooda, Md Maksudal Alam, Ajit Shah, Thai Cao, Li Zhang. Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX.

206B
Mechanism of Non-Genetic Heterogeneity in Growth Rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Shuang Li, Mark Siegal. Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY.

207C
Heavy Water Promotes Longevity in Yeast. Xiyan Li, Michael Snyder. Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

208A
Characterizing SUMO Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using a Versatile Library of Synthetic SMT3 Mutants. P. B. Meluh1, H. A. Newman2, J. Lu2, J. D. Boeke3, M. J. Matunis2. 1) Dept Mol Biol & Gen, Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Med, Baltimore, MD; 2) Dept. Biochem & Mol Biol, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Public Health, Baltimore, MD; 3) Dept Biochem & Mol Pharm, NYU Langone Univ Sch of Med, New York, NY.

209B
Changes in transcription and metabolism during the early stage of replicative cellular senescence in budding yeast. Yukio Mukai1, Yuka Kamei1, Yoshihiro Tamada2, Yasumune Nakayama2, Eiichiro Fukusaki2. 1) Department of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura-cho, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829, Japan; 2) Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

210C
Changes in intracellular abundance and localization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp31p under various environmental stresses suggest its role in neutralizing the effects of oxidative stress insult. Urszula Natkanska1, Adrianna Skoneczna2, Marek Skoneczny1. 1) Department of Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland; 2) Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland.

211A
Cell wall architecture in wine yeast: Compositional and physiological analysis of yeast cell walls having varying impact on wine protein stability. Thulile Ndlovu, Florian F. Bauer. Institute for Wine Biotechnology, Faculty of AgriSciences, South Africa, Western Cape, South Africa.

212B
Elucidating the Effects of Human Genetic Variation On Vitamin D Signaling. Lauren Richardson, Jasper Rine. QB3, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

213C
The stress response pathway is activated in siw14 mutants. Elizabeth Steidle, Daisy Walker, Ronda J. Rolfes. Biology, Georgetown University, Washington , DC.

214A
Inducible and rapid depletion of proteins in S. cerevisiae. Fabian Rudolf, Gintautas Vainorius, Moritz Lang, Joerg Stelling. D-BSSE, ETH Zurich, 4058 Basel, Switzerland.

215B
Changes in the sterol composition affect plasma-membrane potential, intracellular pH and the activity of MDR pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Marie Kodedova, Hana Sychrova. Dept Membrane Transport, Inst Physiology AS CR, Prague 4, Czech Republic.

216C
Selection for strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced Ochratoxin-A detoxification capabilities. Aaron Welch. Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism, Florida International University, North Miami, FL.

217A
Identifying biomarkers of extended chronological lifespan through comparative gene expression profiling. Margaret B. Wierman, Mirela Matecic, Veena Valsakumar, Daniel L. Smith, Stefan Bekiranov, Jeffrey S. Smith. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

218B
An ER-Septin Diffusion Barrier Polarizes the Endoplasmic Reticulum. Andrew K. O. Wong1, Jesse T. Chao1, Shabnam Tavassoli1, Barry P. Young1, Adam Chruscicki2, Nancy N. Fang2,3, LeAnn J. Howe2, Thibault Mayor2,3, Leonard J. Foster2,3, Christopher J. R. Loewen1. 1) Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3) Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

219C
Structural and functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface adhesins. N. Wozniak, H.-U. Mösch. Philipps University Marburg, Department of Genetics, Karl-von-Frisch-Straβe 8, 35043 Marburg, Germany.


Chromosome Dynamics: Centromeres

220A
Chromatin regulation of pericentric non-coding RNA in S. cerevisiae affects chromosome stability. Julia Allison Gallo, Jen Gallagher. Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantwon, WV.

221B
Dynamic Regulation of the Cnn1-Ndc80 Kinetochore Interaction During Mitosis. Kriti Shrestha1, Amanda Oldani2, Cinzia Pagliuca2, Peter De Wulf2, Tony Hazbun1. 1) Dept MCMP, Purdue Univ, West Lafayette, IN; 2) European Institute of Oncology, Department of Experimental Oncology, Milan, 20139, Italy.

222C
Mechanisms for regulation of kinetochore protein levels in budding yeast. Eva Herrero, Peter Thorpe. Stem Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics, National Institute for Medical Research, London, United Kingdom.

223A
Regulation of centromeric nucleosome localization by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Psh1. Erica Marie Hildebrand1,2, Sue Biggins1. 1) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

224B
Development of an in vitro kinetochore assembly assay to investigate kinetochore function and two alternate assembly pathways. Jackie Lang1,2, Sue Biggins1,2. 1) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

225C
Molecular Basis of Deleterious Pericentric Recombination during Meiosis. Mridula Nambiar, Gerald Smith. Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

226A
Mutations in histones H3 and H4 define nucleosome regions essential for chromosome segregation. Payel Chaudhuri, Ines Pinto. Dept Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.


Chromosome Dynamics: Chromosome structure

227B
The stromalin conservative domain in the Scc3 subunit of cohesin mediates the interaction with both Mcd1 and the loading complex. Ola Orgil1, Avi Matityahu1, Thomas Eng2, Vincent Guacci2, Douglas Koshland2, Itay Onn1. 1) Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel; 2) Molecular and Cell Biology Dept, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA.

228C
Stability of a Large Amplification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jamie Pogachar, Celia Payen, Maitreya Dunham. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

229A
Chromosome Breakage at Potential Fragile Sites in Retrotransposon Overdose Strains. Cristina M. Lanzillotta1, Samantha Minikel1, Nicholas Monteleone1, Bracha Erlanger2, Sarah J. Wheelan2, Lisa Z. Scheifele1. 1) Department of Biology, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD; 2) Department of Oncology, Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Center for Computational Genomics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

230B
Interface between a two-cohesin complex model of cohesion and DNA replication. Kevin Tong, Soumya Rudra, Robert V. Skibbens. Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA.


Chromosome Dynamics: Mutagenesis/Repair

231C
Systematic gene over-expression screen for increased mutation rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jonathan S. Ang1, Supipi Duffy1, Peter C. Stirling2, Phil Hieter1. 1) University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; 2) Terry Fox Laboratory, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada.

232A
Suppression of the yeast DNA damage response gene RTT107 by nonphosphorylatable H2A. Joshua A. R. Brown, Michael S. Kobor. Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.

233B
The State of the Rfa2 N-Terminus Affects Rfa1-Protein Interactions that Map Outside of the Rfa1 N-Terminus. Kaitlin M. Dailey, Erica N. Mueller, Gunjan Piya, Stuart J. Haring. Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND.

234C
The mismatch repair recognition complex MutS tracks with the replisome. Joanna E. Haye, Alison E. Gammie. Dept Molec Biol, Princeton Univ, Princeton, NJ.

235A
Distinct Roles for the Rfa2 N-Terminus in the DNA Damage Response and Adaptation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Padmaja L. Ghospurkar1, Timothy M. Wilson1, Amber L. Severson1, Sarah J. Klein2, Sakina K. Khaku2, Andre P. Walther2, Stuart J. Haring1. 1) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, fargo, ND; 2) Biological Sciences, Cedar Crest College, Allentown,PA.

236B
The application of glucose starvation as a selective force for the study of adaptive mutations in yeast. Maria Hubmann, Petra Dorninger, Agnes Civegna, Erich Heidenreich. Institute of Cancer Research, Dep. of Medicine I, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

237C
Volatility of mutator phenotypes at single cell resolution. Alan Herr, Scott Kennedy, Eric Schultz, Thomas Chappell, Gary Knowels, Brendan Kohrn. Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

238A
An experimental system to investigate large-scale CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat expansions. Jane C. Kim, Samantha T. Harris, Kartik A. Shah, Sergei M. Mirkin. Biology, Tufts University, Medford, MA.

239B
Stimulation of RNA Polymerase II ubiquitination by yeast RNA 3’ processing factors is a conserved DNA damage response in eukaryotes. Jason N. Kuehner1, Hilary Duffy1, Claire Moore2. 1) Department of Biology, Emmanuel College, Boston, MA; 2) Department of Developmental, Molecular, and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

240C
Two structurally separable functions of Ctp1 in the early steps of DSB repair. L. Ma, M. Nambiar, N. Milman, GR. Smith. Basic Science Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

241A
Cancer-associated exosome mutations cause DNA:RNA hybrids in yeast. K. Milbury1,2, Y. Chan3, V. Mathew1, P. Hieter2,3,4, P. Stirling1,2,4. 1) Terry Fox Laborotary, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Genome Science and Technology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3) Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4) Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

242B
Numerous extrachromosomal circular DNA elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Henrik D. Møller1, Lance Parsons2, David Botstein2, Birgitte Regenberg1. 1) Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; 2) Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, USA.

243C
The Role of DNM1 in Mitochondrial Genome Stability in Budding Yeast. Christopher T. Prevost, Deanna Pedeville, Rey A. Sia. Dept. of Biology, The College at Brockport-SUNY, Brockport, NY.

244A
Dbf4-dependent kinase regulates both spontaneous and induced mutagenesis by binding to and phosphorylating the Rev7 subunit of DNA polymerase ζ. Robert A. Sclafani1, Luis Brandão1, Rebecca Ferguson1, Irma Santoro3,4, Sue Jinks-Robertson2,4. 1) Dept Biochem, Molec Gen, Univ Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; 3) Department of Biology, 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Reinhardt University, Waleska, GA; 4) Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

245B
Structure-function analysis of the yeast ELG1 gene. Keren Shemesh, Martin Kupiec. Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University,Ramat Aviv, Israel.

246C
The dark side of Swi6; genomic screen for mutants hypersensitive to double strand breaks reveals Swi6 indispensability for genome integrity and maintaining of cellular ploidy. Izabela Brozda1, Paulina Adamus1, Kamil Krol1, Marek Skoneczny2, Adrianna Skoneczna1. 1) Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, PAS, Warsaw, Poland; 2) Department of Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw, Poland.

247A
Genomic screen for mutations conferring zeocin hypersensitivity reveals diverse roles of vesicular trafficking paths in genotoxic stress protection and in genome preservation. Kamil Krol1, Izabela Brozda1, Marek Skoneczny2, Maria Bretner3, Adrianna Skoneczna1. 1) Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, PAS, Warsaw, Poland; 2) Department of Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, PAS, Warsaw, Poland; 3) Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland.

248B
Dynamic behavior of the CIN proteome in response to genotoxic stress. Veena Mathew1, Philip Hieter2, Peter C. Stirling1. 1) Terry Fox Laboratory, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2) Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

249C
Localization to the nuclear pore complex is required for stabilizing CAG repeats. Xiaofeng Su1, Vincent Dion2, Susan M. Gasser3, Catherine H. Freudenreich1. 1) Biology, Tufts University, Medford, MA, USA; 2) Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; 3) Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland.

250A
Interchangeable Parts: Determining Rpa2 N-Terminal and Loop 3-4 Function through the Use of Human/Yeast Rpa2 Hybrid Proteins. Timothy M. Wilson, Kaitlin M. Dailey, Anna Herauf, Jenna Steffes, Erica N. Mueller, Padmaja L. Ghospurkar, Stuart Haring. Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND.


Chromosome Dynamics: Recombination

251B
The role of nucleoporins, specifically Nup2, during meiosis in budding yeast. Daniel Chu, Sean Burgess. MCB, UC Davis, Davis, CA.

252C
Tethering of Meiotic Recombination Hotspots. Kyle R. Fowler, Gerry R. Smith. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

253A
Activation of Holliday junction resolution via phosphorylation of Eme1 in meiosis. Randy W. Hyppa1, Pierre-Marie Dehé2, Pierre-Henri Gaillard2, Gerald R. Smith1. 1) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Cancer Research Center of Marseille, Marseille, France.

254B
A potential novel mechanism for DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice. Tatsuya Ii, Hiromi Ando, Melanie Alvarado, Miki Ii. Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK.

255C
Highly specific contractions of a single CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat by TALEN, in yeast. Guy-Franck Richard, David Viterbo, Varun Khanna, Valentine Mosbach, Bernard Dujon. Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

256A
Redefining the M26 hotspot. Walter Steiner, Chelsea Recor, Bethany Zakrzewski. Dept Biol, Niagara Univ, Lewiston, NY.

257B
The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitochondrial recombination junction- resolving enzyme is functionally homologous to Cce1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stephan Zweifel, Cody Finke, Kristin Andrykovich, Margaret Alexander, Jean Bower. Department of Biology, Carleton College, Northfield, MN.


Chromosome Dynamics: Replication

258C
Autonomously replicating sequences from Kluyveromyces marxianus apparently without canonical consensus. Babiker M. A. Abdel-Banat1,2, Hisashi Hoshida2, Rinji Akada2. 1) Dept. of Crop Protection, University of Khartoum, Khartoum North, Sudan; 2) Dept. of Applied Molecular Bioscience, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Japan.

259A
Tight coevolution of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-partner interaction networks in fungi leads to interspecies network incompatibility. Amir Aharoni1,2, Lyad Zamir4, Inga Sandler1, Eitan Rubin3. 1) Department of Life Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 2) National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 3) Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 4) Department of Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

260B
Characterizing the mechanism of variation in genomic uracil content . Debra Sue Bryan, Kerri York, Jay Hesselberth. Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Univ Colorado School Medicine, Aurora, CO.

261C
Genetic analyses of the Cdc24-Cds1 interaction in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. G. M. Guerrero, M. Nguyen, E. S. Sison, S. G. Pasion. Biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.

262A
The human Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutation in ORC4 reduces replication initiation and rDNA copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Joseph Carlo Sanchez, M. K. Raghuraman, Bonny Brewer. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.


Chromosome Dynamics: Telomeres

263B
Ku primarily impacts telomere length in Saccharomyces cerevisiae via Est1 recruitment to the telomere. Laramie Lemon1, Jaime Williams1, Faissal Ouenzar2, Pascal Chartrand2, Alison Bertuch1. 1) Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; 2) Department of Biochemistry, Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

264C
S. cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1: two new essential functional features in addition to flexible scaffolding. K. J. Lebo, M. A. Mefford, R. O. Niederer, D. C. Zappulla. Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.


Chromosome Dynamics: Transposition

265A
Identification of cellular genes modulating Ty1 copy number control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hyo Won Ahn, David Garfinkel. Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

266B
A role for the budding yeast separase, Esp1, in Ty1 element transposition. Krystina Ho1,2, Lina Ma1, Stephanie Cheung1,2, Nancy Fang2,3, Barry Young4, Christopher Loewen4, Thibault Mayor2,3, Vivien Measday1,2. 1) Wine Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 3) Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4) Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

267C
Functional analysis of Ty1 Gag: trans-dominance and nucleic acid chaperone activity. Yuri Nishida1, Katarzyna Pachulska-Wieczorek2, Jessica Mitchell1, Katarzyna J. Purzycka2, David Garfinkel1. 1) Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA; 2) Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Poznan, Poland.

268A
Regulation of sexual differentiation in Kluyveromyces lactis by endonuclease activity of the transposase-related gene KAT1. Naghmeh Rajaei, Kishore K. Chiruvella, Feng Lin, Stefan U. Åström. Department of Molecular Biosciences, the Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.

269B
A Trans-dominant form of Ty1 Gag mediates Copy Number Control of the Ty1 Retrotransposon in Saccharomyces. Agniva Saha, Jessica Mitchell, Yuri Nishida, Jonathan Hildreth, David Garfinkel. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.


Chromosome Dynamics: Other

270C
A Tetraploid Intermediate Precedes Aneuploid Formation in Yeasts Exposed to Fluconazole. Benjamin Harrison1, Maayan Bibi2, Rebecca Pulver2, Melanie Wellington3, Jordan Hashemi4, Guillermo Sapiro4, Judith G. Berman1,2. 1) Dept Mol Micro & Biotept Mol Micro & Biotechnol, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel; 2) Department of Genetics, Cell Biology & Development, Unversity of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 3) Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester NY; 4) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC.

271A
DNA replication and kinetochore mutants exhibit increased DNA:RNA hybrid formation. A. Chan1, P. Hieter1,2. 1) University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2) Michael Smith Laboratories, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

272B
Dosage CIN genes: A comprehensive analysis of gene dosage effects on genome stability. Supipi Kaluarachchi Duffy, Sidney Ang, Phil Hieter. Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

273C
Evidence that the extra dose of ACT1 causes slow growth in an aneuploid strain disomic for chromosome VI through a dosage imbalance with COF1. Alex Murphy, Keegan Gies, Kun Yang, Emma Kershisnik, Kirk Anders. Biology Department, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA.


Gene Expression: Chromatin

274A
Evolution of chromatin accessibility and gene expression levels during the heat shock response in Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeast. Caitlin Connelly, Joshua Akey. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

275B
A High-Resolution View Of Chromatin Architecture And Transcriptional Repression At Native Telomeres in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Aisha Ellahi, Deborah Thurtle, Jasper Rine. Dept of Molecular and Cell Biology, Univ California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

276C
Investigations on the nature of a nucleosomal region required for proper interactions between the transcription elongation factor Spt16 and transcribed genes in S. cerevisiae. Paige Johnson, Jessalyn Tackett, Eugene Nyamugenda, Ryan Banning, Kelsi McClure, Martha Kellems, Harrison Lindley, Sarah Marshall, Andrea Duina. Biology Department, Hendrix College, Conway, AR.

277A
Studies addressing a possible role for TORC1 in controlling chromatin structure and transcription elongation in S. cerevisiae.. Jasmine Haller1, Mary Allison1, Meet Modi1, James Dornhoffer1, Sarah Marshall1, Taylor McElroy1, Marine Boucherle2, Anne Rufiange2, Malena Outhay1, Jennifer Harper1, Amine Nourani2, Andrea Duina1. 1) Biology Department, Hendrix College, Conway, AR; 2) Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de l’Université Laval, L'Hotel-Dieu de Québec, Québec, Canada.

278B
Loss of transcriptional silencing is not an obligate precursor of yeast senescence. Gavin S. Schlissel, Jasper Rine. UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

279C
Keeping Quiet: Does heterochromatin stay silent during homologous recombination? Katie Sieverman1, Jasper Rine1,2. 1) Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California - Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; 2) California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California - Berkeley, Berkeley CA.


Gene Expression: Epigenetic Mechanisms

280A
Promoting a balanced acetylation state bypasses the requirement for two essential NuA4 subunits in S. cerevisiae. Ana Lilia Torres-Machorro1,2, Naomi E. Frank Searle1,2,3, Lorraine Pillus1,2. 1) Section of Molecular Biology, Division of Biological Sciences University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093; 2) UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California 92093; 3) Biomedical Science Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093.

281B
Ubiquitin-mediated regulation of Snf1/AMPK by Ubp8 and Ubp10 in budding yeast. Hsiang-En Hsu1, Tzu-Ning Liu2, Yi-Chen Lo2, Cheng-Fu Kao1. 1) Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Taipei, Taiwan; 2) Institute of Food Science and Technology, College of Bio-Resources and Agriculture, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

282C
Accumulation of onco-metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate impacts heterochromatin stability. Ryan Janke, Jasper Rine. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

283A
Synergistic repression of FLO11 and histone methylation by the Cyclin C/Cdk8 complex and histone demethylase Jhd2p. Michael J. Law, Kerri Ciccaglione. Rowan University-GSBS, Stratford, NJ.

284B
A cre-lox recombination-based assay for the study of yeast chronological aging in nutrient-rich media conditions. David McCleary, Jasper Rine. UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.


Gene Expression: Nucleo/Cytoplasmic Transport

285C
De novo amino acid biosynthesis influences starvation-induced changes in tRNA distribution. Rebecca L. Hurto1,2, Anita K. Hopper1,2. 1) Molecular Genentics, Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH; 2) The Center for RNA Biology, OSU.

286A
The prion-like domain of the RNA-binding protein Ssd1 regulates the nuclear barcoding of Ssd1 to define its cytoplasmic destiny. Cornelia Kurischko, James R. Broach. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Penn State University, Hershey, PA.


Gene Expression: RNA processing

287B
Ribosome Subunit Biosynthesis Crosstalk During Repression of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis. Brian K. Gregory, Lasse Lindahl. Biological Sciences, UMBC, Baltimore, MD.

288C
Mitochondria outer membrane proteins are required for the proper function and localization of tRNA splicing endonucleases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yao Wan1,2, Jingyan Wu1,2, Anita Hopper1,2. 1) Molecular Genetics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; 2) Center for RNA Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.


Gene Expression: RNA turnover

289A
Determination of in vivo RNA kinetics using RATE-seq. David Gresham, Benjamin Neymotin, Rodoniki Athanasiadou. Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, Department of Biology, New York University, New York, NY.

290B
Global analysis of 5'-hydroxyl RNA surveillance and turnover. Sally Peach, Kerri York, Jay Hesselberth. University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Program in Molecular Biology, Aurora, CO.

291C
Genome-wide study of the interdependence between the cellular growth rate and mRNA turnover. J. Garcia-Martinez2, G. Ayala3, D. A. Medina1, R. Gonzalez4, J. Warringer5, J. E. Perez-Ortin1. 1) Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Universitat de Valencia. Spain; 2) Departamento de Genetica, Universitat de Valencia. Spain; 3) Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universitat de Valencia. Spain; 4) Instituto de Ciencias de la Vid y del Vino. Logrono. Spain; 5) Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

292A
Systematic Identification and Analysis of pre-mRNA Splicing Regulators in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. H. Wang1,2, T. Chang1,2, M. Hwang1,2. 1) Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan; 2) Genome and Systems Biology Degree Program, NTU, Taipei, Taiwan.


Gene Expression: Transcription

293B
In search of PP2A/Cdc55 targets involved in stress induced transcription. Jessica Ferrari, Wolfgang Reiter, David Hollenstein, Gustav Ammerer. Dept Biochem & Cell Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

294C
Regulation of stress induced gene expression in yeast. Vasudha Bharatula1, Nils Elfving2, Razvan Chereji3, Stephan Bjorklund4, Alexandre Morozov3, James Broach1. 1) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA; 2) Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, Umeå 901 87, Sweden; 3) Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; 4) BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

295A
Natural yeast promoter variants harbour different levels of transcriptional-mediated noise. Jian Liu1, Marlène Vuillemin1, Hélène Martin-Yken1, Frédéric Bigey2, Sylvie Dequin2, Jean-Marie François1, Jean-Pascal Capp1. 1) LISBP, INSA/Univ. of Toulouse, Toulouse, France; 2) INRA, UMR 1083, Montpellier, France.

296B
Role of Chromosomal Looping in the Transcriptional Regulation of Molecular Chaperone Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surabhi Chowdhary, David Gross. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA.

297C
Transciptional Profiling of Budding Yeast Biofilm Suppressors. Gareth Cromie1, Zhihao Tan1,2, Eric Jeffery1, Michelle Hays2, Cecilia Garmendia3, Aimée Dudley1,2. 1) Dudley Group, Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Inst, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA USA; 3) Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Strasbourg, France.

298A
Unanticipated complexity at the GAT1 locus. I. Georis1, R. Rai2, J. J. Tate2, T. G. Cooper2, E. Dubois1. 1) Institut de Recherches Microbiologiques J.-M. Wiame, Brussels, Belgium; 2) Dept. Microbiology, Immunology and Biochemistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.

299B
Selective interaction of RNA-binding proteins with transcript isoforms shapes the post-transcriptional life of mRNA. Ishaan Gupta1, Bernd Klaus2, Sandra Cluader-Münster1, Aino Jäverlin1, Raeka Aiyar1, Vicente Pelechano1, Lars Steinmetz1,3,4. 1) 1European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; 2) European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Centre for Statistical Data Analysis, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; 3) Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Genetics, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; 4) Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 California Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94305, USA.

300C
Spinning disk confocal microscopy of galactose-responsive intra-nuclear clusters of the Gal80 protein in live cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. James E. Hopper1,2, Sudip Goswami1, Onur Egriboz1, Kathleen Dotts1. 1) Dept Molecular Genetics, Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH; 2) Dept of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio State Univ, Columbus OH.

301A
Controlling isoprenoid production using a microaerobic-responsive switch in yeast. Hanxiao Jiang, Robert Dahl, Adam Meadows. Amyris Inc. , 5885 Hollis St. Suite 100, Emeryville, CA 94608.

302B
Changes in RNA Polymerase II catalytic activity influence transcription start site utilization on a global scale. H. Jin1, S. Schwartz2, I. Vvedenskaya3, I. Malik1, C. Qiu1, B. Nickels3, C. Kaplan1. 1) Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA; 2) Texas Agrilife Research, Genomics and Bioinformatics, College Station, TX, 77840, USA; 3) Waksman Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

303C
CK2-dependent Regulation of Ifh1 Transcription Factor Involved in the Expression of Ribosomal Protein Genes. Myung Sup Kim, Ji-Sook Hahn. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University.

304A
Effect of Modulating the Level of the Seventh Largest Subunit of RNA Polymerase II in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Deepak Kumar, Nimisha Sharma. University School of Biotechnology, G.G.S Indraprastha University, Sec.16C, Dwarka, New Delhi, India-110078.

305B
DNA Replication Checkpoint Regulation of Cell-Cycle Transcription Dynamics. Adam R. Leman1, Kevin A. McGoff2, Xin Guo3, John Harer2, Steven B. Haase2. 1) Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC; 2) Mathematics, Duke University, Durham, NC; 3) Statistical Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC.

306C
The thiamine signal transduction pathway in Candida glabrata. Sarah Grace Leone, Nicholas Attanasio, Michael Peel, Christine Iosue, Dennis Wykoff. Biology, Villanova University, Villanova, PA.

307A
Transcriptional Regulation of HAP4 by the Mediator Complex and Adenine Levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chad Bush, Denise Capps, Mengying Chiang, Tammy Pracheil, Zhengchang Liu. Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, LA 70148.

308B
Loss of Ubp3 increases Silencing, decreases Unequal Recombination in rDNA, and shortens the Replicative Life Span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. David Oling, Rehan Masoom, Kristian Kvint. Chemistry and Molecular Biology, Medicinaregatan 9C, 41390, University Gothenburg, Sweden.

309C
Phenotypic landscape of the conserved and essential RNA Polymerase II trigger loop: a high-throughput structure-function analysis. Chenxi Qiu, Olivia Erinne, Ping Cui, Kenny Lam, Sabareesh Babu, Huiyan Jin, Alvin Tang, Nandhini Mutukrishnan, Craig Kaplan. Biochemistry&Biophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station,TX.

310A
Analysis of ncDNA transcription for roles in regulating gene expression. Elizabeth A. Raupach1, Joseph Martens2. 1) Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, PIttsburgh, PA; 2) Biology, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY.

311B
Functional analysis of gene expression within the Lachancea kluyveri species. Christian Brion, David Pflieger, Joseph Schacherer. Department of Genetics and Genomics, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

312C
Functional analysis of stress regulated non-coding RNAs in budding yeast. Amanda N. Scholes, Tara N. Stuecker, Jeffery A. Lewis. Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.

313A
FACS-based genetic screen in S. cerevisiae identifies genes involved in the alpha-factor response. Anna Sliva1,2, Zheng Kuang1,2, Jef Boeke1,2. 1) High Throughput Biology Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205; 2) New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016.

314B
Adaptive evolution of transcription and translation in pathogenic yeast. Xuepeng Sun1,2, Zhe Wang1, Zhenglong Gu1. 1) Division of nutritional sciences, Ithaca, NY; 2) College of Agriculture and Biotechnology.

315C
PRS gene family - a means of linking primary metabolism and cell signalling. Eziuche Amadike Ugbogu, Lilian Marry Schweizer, Michael Schweizer. Biochemistry, Heriot-watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

316A
S. cerevisae rRNA Synthesis by RNA Polymerase (Pol) II in Response to Nitrogen Deprivation. Arjuna Rao Vallabhaneni, Merita Kabashi, Kushal Bhatt, Heather Conrad-Webb. Biology, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX.

317B
Systematic analysis of RNA polymerase III and TFIIIB phosphoregulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Jaehoon Lee, Robyn D. Moir, Ian M. Willis. Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

318C
Defining the transcriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Janos Demeter, Paul Lloyd, Edith Wong, J. Michael Cherry. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

319A
Dissection of the PHO pathway in S. pombe using epistasis and the alternate repressor adenine. Molly S. Estill, Christine L. Iosue, Dennis D. Wykoff. Dept Biol, Villanova Univ, Villanova, PA.

320B
Accumulation of a threonine biosynthetic intermediate attenuates general amino acid control by inducing degradation of promoter-bound Gcn4. FNU Yashpal, Hongfang Qiu, Alan G. Hinnebusch. Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Development, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.


Gene Expression: Translation

321C
Codon Context and Translation Efficiency in Yeast. Caitlin E. Gamble1, Christina Brule2, Stanley Fields1,3, Elizabeth Grayhack2. 1) Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

322A
Functional alnalysis of CaMCA1 and EDC3 in oxidative stress response and apoptotic cell death in Candida albicans. Jeong-Hoon Jeong, Jong-hwan Jung, Jinmi Kim. Department of Microbiology and Molecular biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea.

323B
Roles of decapping activators in mRNA translation and P-body formation during mating. Daehee Jung, Yuseon Lee, Jinmi Kim. Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea.

324C
Evolutionary Divergence of the Stress Response at the Translational Level. Pieter J. Spealman, Alan Shteyman, Charles McManus. Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, PITTSBURGH, PA.


Gene Expression: Other

325A
Improving heterologous cytochrome P450 function in S. cerevisiae. Anita Emmerstorfer1, Miriam Wimmer1, Tamara Wriessnegger1, Erich Leitner2, Monika Müller3, Iwona Kaluzna3, Martin Schurmann3, Daniel Mink3, Guenther Zellnig4, Harald Pichler1,5. 1) ACIB GmbH, Petersgasse 14, 8010 Graz, Austria; 2) Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz, Austria; 3) DSM Innovative Synthesis B.V., Urmonderbaan 22, 6167 RD Geleen, The Netherlands; 4) Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Graz, Schubertstrasse 51, 8010 Graz, Austria; 5) Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 14/2, 8010 Graz, Austria.

326B
Mutants defective in stress granule formation exhibit a deregulated stress response. Elena Garre1, Xiaoxue Yang2, Yi Shen2, Xinxin Hao1, Daniel Krumlinde1, Marija Cvijović3,4, Christina Arens1, Thomas Nyström1, Beidong Liu1,2, Per Sunnerhagen1. 1) Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; 2) School of Life Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China; 3) Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; 4) Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.

327C
Securing autoselection in yeast ACNase killer toxin systems by mRNA fragmentation. Alene Kast, Friedhelm Meinhardt. Institute of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Münster, Corrrensstr. 3, 48149 Münster, Germany.

328A
Gene copy number and colony morphology in wild yeast strains. Derek Wilkinson1, Vratislav Stovicek3, Libuse Vachova2, Zdena Palkova1. 1) Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Vinicna 5, 128 44 Prague 2, Czech Republic; 2) Institute of Microbiology of the ASCR, v.v.i., Videska 1083, 142 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic; 3) The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Kogle Alle 6, 2970 Hørsholm, Denmark.

329B
Chaperonins enabled functional expression of bacterial xylose isomerases in yeast. Jianjun Yang1, Min Qi1, Kristen Kelly1, Sarah Rush2, Luan Tao2, Rick Ye1, Paul Viitanen2, William Hitz2. 1) Biotechnology, DuPont Central Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE; 2) DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE.

330C
Dissecting the mechanism of gene-dosage response in naturally aneuploid, wild isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mun Hong Yong1, James Hose1, Audrey Gasch1,2. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Genome Center of Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.


Global Analysis: Evolution/Comparative Genomics

331A
Rerouting resources from cell size to population growth drives evolution of cancer drug resistance in yeast. E. Alonso-Perez1, N. Srinivas1, M. Kakavandi1, K. Ludwig1, I. Jonassen2, SW Omholt3, P. Sunnerhagen1, J. Warringer1. 1) Department of Chemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg. Gothenburg, Sweden; 2) Uni Computing, Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway ; Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 3) Center for Integrative Genetics (CIGENE), Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB), Ås, Norway.

332B
Inferring Genetic Networks through Evolutionary Signatures. Zelia Ferreira1, Jennifer Walker1, Allyson O'Donnell2, Nathan Clark1. 1) Computational and Systems Biology, University of Pittsburgh, PA; 2) Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh, PA.

333C
The mating pathway as a model for the genetic analysis of complex traits. Michael W. Dorrity1,2, Josh T. Cuperus2,3, Christine Queitsch2, Stanley Fields2,3. 1) Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

334A
Functional Evolution of SIR1 In Saccharomyces cerevisiae And Related Budding Yeasts. Aisha Ellahi, Jasper Rine. Dept MCB, Univ California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

335B
Microevolution of a human fungal pathogen in a mouse model of systemic infection. Iuliana Ene1, Matthew Hirakawa1, Emily Mallick1, Christina Cuomo2, Richard Bennett1. 1) Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Brown University, Providence, RI; 2) Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA.

336C
Phenotypic and Mitochondrial Haplotype Variation in a Local Population of Wild Yeasts. Raymond A. Futia, Abigail P. Weinberg, Mei-Yi Zheng, Heather L. Fiumera. Department of Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY.

337A
Emergence of Novel Ecological Interactions in an Evolving Cooperative Community. Robin Green1,2, Chichun Chen1, Jose Pineda1, Wenying Shou1. 1) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

338B
Tracking the genetic factors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under the selective pressures of the beer brewing process. Noah A. Hanson, Celia Payen, Maitreya Dunham. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

339C
Ploidy-regulated variation in biofilm-related phenotypes in natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Elyse A. Hope, Maitreya J. Dunham. Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

340A
A two loci genetic incompatibility leads to offspring respiratory deficiency within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species. Jing Hou, Anne Freidrich, Joseph Schacherer. Laboratoire de génétique moléculaire, génomique et microbiologie, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS UMR7156, Strasbourg, France.

341B
Site-directed changes to CgPMU1 convert it into a broad range acid phosphatase like CgPMU2 in Candida glabrata. Christine L. Iosue, Kelly A. Orlando, Sarah G. Leone, Danielle L. Davies, Dennis D. Wykoff. Biol Dept, Villanova Univ, Villanova, PA.

342C
Why do some yeast species have duplicate copies of GALactose network genes? Meihua Christina Kuang1,2, Chris Hittinger1,2. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Graduate Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI.

343A
Single-cell analysis reveals natural variability in a potential bet-hedging trait. Colin S. Maxwell, Paul Magwene. Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC.

344B
Combining natural sequence variation with high throughput mutational data to reveal protein interaction sites. Daniel Melamed1,2, David Young2, Christina Miller1,2, Stanley Fields1,2,3. 1) Howard Hughes Medical Institute; 2) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington; 3) Department of Medicine, University of Washington.

345C
Transport differences in two recently high affinity HXT paralogous. A. Mena1,2, E. Barrio1, F. N. Arroyo-López3. 1) University of Valencia Calle Doctor Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjasot, Valencia; 2) IATA-CSIC Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology Carrer Catedràtic Agustín Escardino Benlloch, 7, 46980 Paterna, València; 3) CSIC Instituto de la Grasa, Department of Food Biotechnology Av Padre García Tejero, 4, 41012 Sevilla.

346A
Novelty by necessity: Loss of sulfate transport in yeast repeatedly selects for mutations in an uncharacterized transporter YIL166C in sulfate-limited environments. Aaron W. Miller, Ivan Liachko, Anna B. Sunshine, Maitreya J. Dunham. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

347B
The Genetic Architecture of Invasive Growth in a Clinical Isolate of S. cerevisiae. Helen A. Murphy1,2, Debra Murray2, Jason Smyth3, Cliff W. Zeyl3, Paul M. Magwene2. 1) Biology, William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; 2) Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC; 3) Biology, Wake Forest University, NC.

348C
Mitochondrial-Nuclear Epistasis and Coevolution in Natural Isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Swati Paliwal, Anthony C. Fiumera, Heather L. Fiumera. Biological Sciences, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902.

349A
Investigating reticulate evolution in the Saccharomyces genus and repeating it for the bioethanol industry. David Peris Navarro1,2, Kayla Sylvester1, Maria Sardi1, William Alexander1,2, Diego Libkind3, Paula Gonçalves4, José Sampaio4, Lucas Parreiras2, Trey Sato2, Chris Hittinger1,2. 1) Department of Genetics, Genome Center of Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI; 2) Wisconsin Energy Institute, DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI; 3) Laboratorio de Microbiología Aplicada y Biotechnología, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medio-ambiente, INIBIOMA (CONICET-UNComahue), Bariloche, Argentina; 4) Centro de Recursos Microbiológicos, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Cieências e Tecnologia, Universidad Nova de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal.

350B
‘’Natural and experimental evolutionary dynamics of Saccharomyces killer yeast’’. Magdalena Pieczynska1,2, Ryszard Korona2, J. Arjan G. M. de Visser1. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, Plant Sciences Group, Wageningen, Netherlands; 2) Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, Kraków, Poland.

351C
Natural variation in mutational robustness among strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Marcin Plech1, J. Arjan G. M. de Visser2, Ryszard Korona1. 1) Institute of Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland; 2) Genetics Lab, Plant Sciences Group, University of Wageningen, The Netherlands.

352A
Genetic variation acting on protein translation and degradation rates is common in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Daniel Pollard, Homa Rahnamoun, Scott Rifkin. Biological Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA.

353B
Genome-wide patterns of genetic variation reveal chromosome-scale heterogeneous evolution in a protoploid yeast. Anne Friedrich1, Paul Jung1, Cyrielle Reisser1, Gilles Fischer2,3, Joseph Schacherer1. 1) Department of Genetics and Genomics, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; 2) Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7238, Biologie Computationnelle et Quantitative, Paris, France; 3) CNRS, UMR7238, Biologie Computationnelle et Quantitative, Paris, France.

354C
Genome sequence and evolution of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, the world’s first pure culture lager yeast. Andrea Walther, Ana Hesselbart, Jurgen W. Wendland. Yeast Genetics, Carlsberg Laboratory, Copenhagen V, Denmark.

355A
Evolutionary Exploration of Yeast Hap4p Regulatory Networks. Ruoyu Zhang, Xiaoxian Guo, Zhenglong Gu. Division of Nutritional Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


Global Analysis: Genomics

356B
The yeast phenome: mapping the functional organization of a eukaryotic cell through an integrative study of genome-wide phenotypic surveys. Anastasia Baryshnikova1, Monica Sanchez2, Maitreya Dunham2. 1) Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 2) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

357C
Multiplexed genome engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Josh Cuperus1,2, Russel Lo1,2, Stanley Fields1,2. 1) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.

358A
A Candida albicans population genomics study. Marie-Elisabeth Bougnoux1, Katja Schwartz2, Corinne Maufrais3, Natacha Sertour1, Guillaume Laval4, Kerstin Voelz5, Robin May5, Richard Bennett6, Gavin Sherlock2, Christophe d'Enfert1. 1) Institut Pasteur, Fungal Biology & Pathogenicity, Paris, France; 2) Stanford University, Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA; 3) Institut Pasteur, CIB, Paris, France; 4) Institut Pasteur, Human Evolutionary Genetics, Paris, France; 5) University of Birmingham, Institute of Microbiology & Infection and the School of Biosciences, Birmingham, United Kingdom; 6) Brown University, Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

359B
Multiple global approaches for deciphering the molecular basis of low temperature adaptation in wine yeast. Estéfani García-Ríos1, María López-Malo1,2, José Manuel Guillamón1. 1) Departamento de Biotecnología de los alimentos, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de los Alimentos (CSIC), Avda. Agustín Escardino, 7, E-46980-Paterna , Valencia, Spainlencia, Valencia, Spain; 2) Biotecnologia Enològica. Departament de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Facultat de Enologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili. Marcel•li Domingo s/n, 43007, Tarragona, Spain.

360C
Expression adaptation and gene-dosage response in naturally aneuploid strains of wild S. cerevisiae. James Hose1, Chris Yong1, Zhishi Wang2, Michael A. Newton2, Audrey P. Gasch1. 1) Laboratory of Genetics & Genome Ctr, U. Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Departments of Statistics & Biostatistics & Medical Informatics, U. Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

361A
MKT1 interacts with nitrogen metabolism and mitochondrial signaling pathways to modulate sporulation efficiency variation. Saumya Gupta1, Aparna Radhakrishnan1, Julien Gagneur2, Himanshu Sinha1. 1) Department of Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005, India; 2) Gene Center Munich, Department of Biochemistry, Ludwig Maximilians University, 81377 Munich, Germany.

362B
Identification of novel pathways involved in ploidy maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. S. Hung1,2, T. L. Sing1,2, S. Ohnuki3, B. San-Luis2,4, J. Paw2,4, M. Costanzo2,4, C. Nislow5, C. Boone2,4, Y. Ohya3, G. W. Brown1,2. 1) Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3) Department of Integrated Biosciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 4) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5) Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

363C
Cost-effective Genotyping and Karyotyping Using Double Digest-RAD Sequencing in S. cerevisiae, C. albicans and C. glabrata. E. Jeffery1, G. Cromie1, A. Forche2, J. Usher3, K. Haynes3, J. Berman4, A. M. Dudley1. 1) Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Inst, Seattle, WA. USA; 2) Bowdoin College, Department of Biology, Brunswick, ME. USA; 3) University of Exeter, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Exeter, UK; 4) Tel-Aviv University, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

364A
A higher-throughput accurate method for unraveling the genetic basis of Chronological Life Span in yeast. Paul P. Jung1, Nils Christian1, Daniel Kay1, Aimée M. Dudley2, Alexander Skupin1, Carole L. Linster1. 1) University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg; 2) Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle.

365B
Evidence that mutation accumulation does not cause aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Alaattin Kaya, Alexei V. Lobanov, Vadim N. Gladyshev. Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, MA.

366C
Pooled Segregant Sequencing Reveals Genetic Determinants of Yeast Pseudohyphal Growth. Qingxuan Song1, Cole Johnson1, Thomas Wilson2, Anuj Kumar1. 1) Dept. of Mol., Cell., and Dev. Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2) Dept. of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI.

367A
Genetic Incompatibilities in Hybrid Yeast. Samuel M. Lancaster, Miatreya J. Dunham. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

368B
An Evaluation of High-Throughput Approaches to QTL Mapping in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stefan Wilkening1, Gen Lin1, Emilie Fritsch1, Manu Tekkedil1, Simon Anders1, Rauel Kuehn2, Michelle Nguyen2, Raeka Aiyar1, Michael Proctor2, Nikita Sakhaneko3, David Galas3,4, Julien Gagneur3, Adam Deutschbauer5, Lars Steinmetz1. 1) European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Genome Biology Unit, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany; 2) Stanford Genome Technology Center, Palo Alto, California 94304; 3) Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98122; 4) Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, University of Luxembourg, L-4362, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg; 5) Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720.

369C
An Assessment of Terminal Phenotypes in S. cerevisiae Using Synthetic Genetic Array and High-Content Screening. Dara Lo1, Jason Moffat1,2, Brenda Andrews1,2, Charles Boone1,2. 1) Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

370A
Beyond Beer and Wine: Isolating Wild Yeast from Unroasted Cacao and Coffee Beans. Catherine Ludlow1, Cecilia Garmendia Torres2, Amy Sirr1, Michelle Hays3, Colby Field4, Gareth Cromie1, Eric W. Jeffery1, Aimée M. Dudley1,3. 1) Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA; 2) Institut de génétique et de biologie moléculaire et cellulaire, Strasbourg, France; 3) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA USA; 4) Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA.

371B
Exploring the endocytic pathway by combining high-throughput genetics and high-content microscopy. Mojca Mattiazzi Usaj1, Matej Usaj1, Marinka Zitnik2, Blaz Zupan2, Brenda Andrews1, Charles Boone1. 1) The Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Faculty of Computer and Information Science, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

372C
Navigating the chemical space of large compound libraries using high-throughput chemical genomics. Jeff Piotrowski1, Sheena Li2, Raamensh Deshpande3, Scott Simpkins3, Justin Nelson3, Jacqueline Barber2, Hiroyuki Osada2, Minoru Yoshida2, Chad Myers3, Charlie Boone4. 1) Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Centre University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA 53726; 2) Center for Sustainable Resource Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, Japan 351-0198; 3) Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; 4) 4.Banting and Best Department of Medical Research and Department of Molecular Genetics, Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, 160 College St., Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3E1.

373A
Transcriptional and post-transcriptional analyses of the iron deficiency response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Antonia Maria Romero1, Daniel A. Medina2, Jose García-Martinez3, M.Teresa Martínez-Pastor2, Jose E. Pérez-Ortín2, Sergi Puig1. 1) 1Departamento de Biotecnología, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos (IATA) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Paterna, Valencia, E-46100, Spain; 2) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Universitat de València. Ave. Doctor Moliner, 50; E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) Spain; 3) Department of Genetics. Universitat de València. Ave. Doctor Moliner, 50; E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) Spain.

374B
Transcriptional variations among Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring different alleles of a transcription factor Yrr1. Xiaoqing Rong-Mullins1, Wei Zheng2, Hogune Im2, Erin Mitsunaga2, Michael Snyder2, Jennifer Gallgher1. 1) Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV; 2) Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

375C
Comparative analysis of stress responses in diverse wild yeast strains. Nikolay S. Rovinskiy1,2, Dana J. Wohlbach1,2, Jeff Lewis1,2, Maria I. Sardi1,2, Wendy S. Schackwitz3, Joel A. Martin3, Shweta Deshpande3, Chris Daum3, Trey K. Sato2, Audrey P. Gasch1,2. 1) Genetics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center; Madison, Wisconsin 53706; 3) US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Walnut Creek, California 94598.

376A
Chromatin organization in quiescent yeast. Mark T. Rutledge1,2, Jon-Matthew Belton3, Mariano Russo2, Job Dekker3, James R. Broach2. 1) Dept. of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 2) Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA; 3) Program in Systems Biology, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.

377B
Genomic approaches to understanding Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to lignocellulosic-hydrolysate toxins. Maria I. Sardi, Dana J. Wohlbach, Audrey P. Gasch. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

378C
A phenomic assessment of sub-cellular morphology in S. cerevisiae using Synthetic Genetic Array analysis and high-content screening. Erin B. Styles1, Lee Zamparo1, Karen Founk1, Oren Kraus1,2, Dogus Altintas3, Marco Graf4, Daniele Novarino5, Tina Sing1, Grant W. Brown1, Marco Muzi-Falconi5, Brian Luke4, David Shore3, Brendan Frey2, Zhaolei Zhang1, Charles Boone1, Brenda J. Andrews1. 1) Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2) Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3) Department of Molecular Biology, NCCR Program "Frontiers in Genetics", and Institute of Genetics and Genomics in Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland; 4) DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 282, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany; 5) Dipartimento di Bioscienze Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy.

379A
Genetic basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilm in liquid medium. Kaj S. Andersen1, Laura G. R. Sørensen1, Rasmus Bojsen2,3, Martin W. Nielsen2,3, Michael Lisby1, Anders Folkesson2,3, Birgitte Regenberg1. 1) Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2) Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3) National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.

380B
An all-in-one yeast library - creating a new toolbox for studying the proteome. Uri Weill, Ido Yofe, Maya Schuldiner. Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.


Global Analysis: Human Diseases/Drug Discovery

381C
Establishing the yeast as a model for human disease. Neta Agmon, Leslie Mitchell, Jef Boeke. Bioch & Mol Pharm, Institute of Systems Genentics, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY.

382A
Mapping resistance to targeted cancer therapeutics using a deep mutational scanning approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ethan Ahler, Douglas Fowler. Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

383B
Synthetic dosage lethality of CTF4 and the identification of orthologs amplified in breast cancer. Eric Bryant1, John Dittmar2, Robert J. D. Reid2, Rodney Rothstein2. 1) Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027; 2) Genetics and Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032.

384C
Identification of biological roles for yeast Rbd2, a member of a subfamily of rhomboid proteins implicated in human disease. Christa L. Cortesio1, Eric B. Lewellyn1, Nathaniel I. Krefman1, Catherine C. Wong2, John R. Yates 3rd2, David G. Drubin1. 1) Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA; 2) Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA.

385A
Elucidating the metabolic basis of cancer using yeast as a surrogate system: A model for tumorigenesis. Jaswandi U. Dandekar1, Abhay Kumar2, P. Jayadeva Bhat1. 1) Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai, India; 2) Thyrocare Technologies Limited, Navi Mumbai.

386B
Interactions of HEM25 with Genes Encoding for the Mitochondrial Transporters Family (SLC25). J. Noelia Dufay1, J. Pedro Fernández-Murray1, Christopher R. McMaster1,2. 1) Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2) Pharmacology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

387C
Yeast - it simply has a lot to say about human disease. Selina S. Dwight, Kalpana Karra, J. Michael Cherry, SGD Project. Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305.

388A
Deep mutational scanning of amyloid β to illuminate mechanisms of protein aggregation and chaperone interactions. Vanessa E. Gray, Jason J. Stephany, Douglas M. Fowler. Genome Sciences, School of Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

389B
Solving protein structure with large-scale mutagenesis. Katherine A. Sitko, Douglas M. Fowler, Margaret L. Griset. Genome Sciences, School of Medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

390C
Systematic identification of human/yeast cross-species complementation pairs. Akil Hamza, Phil Hieter. Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

391A
Anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 induces the heat shock response in yeast. Laura Stultz1, Alexandra Hunsucker2, Evan Grovenstein2, James Mobley3, Pamela Hanson2. 1) Chemistry Department, Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, AL; 2) Biology Department, Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, AL; 3) Mass Spectrometry/Proteomics Facility, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

392B
Development of a fission yeast-based high throughput screen to target heterologously-expressed cAMP signaling pathway proteins. Ana Santos de Medeiros, Alexander Magee, Grace Kwak, Sam Rivera, Jordan Vanderhooft, Rachel Gottlieb, Charles S. Hoffman. Biology Dept, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA.

393C
S. cerevisiae as a Platform for High Throughput Screening and Variant Analysis of the Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Family. Jacob Hornick1, Son Nguyen4, Pam Benegal3, Shen-Shu Sung2, James Broach1. 1) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA; 2) Department of Pharmacology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA; 3) Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ; 4) Union College, Schenectady, NY.

394A
Ribosomal Perturbation as a Strategy for Improving Protein Biogenesis in Cystic Fibrosis. Mert Icyuz1, Kathryn E. Oliver2, Eric J. Sorscher2, John L. Hartman IV1. 1) Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BIRMINGHAM, AL; 2) Gregory Fleming James Cystic Fibrosis Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham,BIRMINGHAM, AL.

395B
Arg-Trp-Arg based peptidomimetics with antifungal activity. Camilla E. Larsen1, Camilla J. Larsen2, Henrik Franzyk2, Birgitte Regenberg1. 1) Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark; 2) Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

396C
Expression, modification and characterization of fungal natural products in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. C. Harvey, J. Li, M. Hillenmeyer, R. Davis. Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

397A
Chemical genomic profiling in S. cerevisiae and S. pombe to functionally annotate large compound collections. Sheena C. Li1,4, Jeff Piotrowski2, Raamesh Deshpande3, Scott Simpkins3, Justin Nelson3, Jacqueline Barber1, Minoru Yoshida1, Chad L. Myers3, Charles Boone1,4. 1) RIKEN CSRS, Wako, Saitama, Japan; 2) GLBRC, University of Wisconsin-Madison; 3) University of Minnesota; 4) University of Toronto, Canada.

398B
Genome-wide screening in yeast identifies genes involved in the localization of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1. Samuele Lodovichi1, Giulia Rocchi1, Marco La Ferla1, Alberto Mercatanti1, Tiziana Cervelli1, Maria Adelaide Caligo2, Alvaro Galli1. 1) CNR, Pisa, Italy; 2) Azienda ospedaliera Santa Chiara, Pisa, Italy.

399C
Shared pHenotypes: Using a yeast genetic screen as a way to identify mammalian genes required for cellular survival during intracellular acidification. Jennifer A. McQueen, John Shin, Susan Li, Pamela Austin, Calvin Roskelley, Christopher Loewen. Cellular and Physiological Sciences, Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, BR., BC, Canada.

400A
The Effects of Omega-3-Fatty Acids on Intracellular inositol levels in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Marlene N. Murray, Bomi Kim, Jee Yeon Lee. Biology, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI.

401B
Making Genetic Suppressors for Yeast Genes Whose Orthologs are Involved in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa. Zahra NaghdiGheshlaghi, Jolanda van Leeuwen, Brenda Andrews, Charles Boone. Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

402C
Genetic Analysis of the Warburg Effect in Yeast. Mobolanle Olayanju, James Hampsey, Michael Hampsey. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rutgers University - R W Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ.

403A
Discovering Novel Inhibitors of Deubiquitinases in vivo: Strategies using Budding Yeast. Natasha Pascoe1,2, Michael Costanzo1,2, Sachdev Sidhu1,2,3, Charles Boone1,2,3. 1) Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Terrance Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3) Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

404B
A connection between chromosome condensation/cohesion pathways and the toxic effects of the Huntington disease protein in a yeast model. Biranchi N. Patra, Scott Breslow, Jocelyn Wensel, Animesh Ray. School of Applied Life Sciences, Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont, CA.

405C
Anti amyloidogenic potential of danshen derived chemicals and their analogs analysed by in vitro and in vivo yeast assay. Afsaneh Porzoor1, Lynne J. Waddington2, Helmut Hügel3, Danilla Grando1, Ian G. Macreadie1, Joanne M. Caine2. 1) Scool of Applied Sciences- Biosciences, RMIT University, Melbourne- Bundoora, VIC, Australia; 2) 2Materials Science and Engineering, CSIRO Preventative Health Flagship, 343 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; 3) School of Applied Sciences, Applied Chemistry, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia.

406A
A yeast synthetic genetic interaction screen predicts the importance of Plk1 for the viability of cancer cells over-expressing CKS1b. Robert J. D. Reid1, Xing Du2, Ivana Sunjevaric1, Vinayak Rayannavar2, John Dittmar1, Matt Maurer2, Rodney Rothstein1. 1) Genetics & Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; 2) Dept of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

407B
Efflux of the quinone methide maytenin through yeast cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. T. M. Souza-Moreira1, V. A. F. F. M. Santos1, S. R. Valentini2, C. F. Zanelli2, M. Furlan1. 1) Organic Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, Araraquara, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2) Biological Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNESP, Araraquara, SP, Brazil.

408C
Small molecule inhibitors of human Tsg101. Katherine A. Strynatka, Pak P. Poon, Christopher R. McMaster. Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

409A
Developing assays for pathogenic human variation via systematic testing of yeast/human complementation. Song Sun1,2,3,4,5, Fan Yang1,2,3,4, Guihong Tan1,2, Michael Costanzo1,2, Rose Oughtred6, Jodi Hirschman6, Chandra Theesfeld6, Analyn Yu1,2,3,4, Tanya Tyagi1,2,3,4, Brenda Andrews1,2, Nidhi Sahni7,8, Song Yi7,8, David Hill7,8, Marc Vidal7,8, Charlie Boone1,2, Kara Dolinski6, Frederick Roth1,2,3,4,7. 1) Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 3) Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 4) Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5) Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 6) Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA; 7) Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; 8) Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

410B
Exploiting cancer-specific metabolism as a therapeutic strategy. L. H. Wong, G. Giaver, C. Nislow. Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.


Global Analysis: Informatics/Computational Biology

411C
Transcriptional regulation and protein complexes in budding yeast. Stacia R. Engel, Maria C. Costanzo, Kelley Paskov, J. Michael Cherry. Dept Genetics, Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA.

412A
TreeView 3.0: Visualization and Analysis of Two-Dimensional Genomic Data. Christopher Keil, Anastasia Baryshnikova. Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ.

413B
PubChase: A tool for personalized publication recommendations and automated knowledge discovery. Matthew Davis2, Alexei Stoliartchouk1, Lenny Teytelman1. 1) ZappyLab, Kensington, CA; 2) The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.

414C
Tyre: An in Silico Simulator of Population Dynamics. Jill N. Wright1, Jessica Stilwell2, Christopher Zahner1, Hui Hua1, Brandt L. Schneider1. 1) Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX; 2) Texas Tech University, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Lubbock, TX.

415A
Balony: a software package for analysis of data generated by synthetic genetic array experiments. Barry Young, Christopher Loewen. Dept Cell Phys Sci, Life Sci Inst, Vancouver, BC, Canada.


Global Analysis: Networks

416B
Profiling the RNA maturation landscape in yeast. Alexander Ratushny1,2, Marlene Oeffinger4, Wei-Ming Chen2, Karen Wei4, Peter Fridy3, Richard Rogers2, Ramsey Saleem1,2, Garrett Poshusta1, Michael Rout3, John Aitchison1,2. 1) Systems Biology, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA, USA; 2) Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA; 3) Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA; 4) Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

417C
Cin5, Gln3, Hmo1, and Zap1 Contribute to the Gene Regulatory Network Controlling the Cold Shock Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kam D. Dahlquist1, Ben G. Fitzpatrick2, Cybele Arsan1, Wesley T. Citti1, Kevin C. Entzminger1, Andrew F. Herman1, Lauren N. Kubeck1, Stephanie D. Kuelbs2, Heather King1, Elizabeth M. Liu1, Matthew Mejia1, Kenny R. Rodriguez1, Nicholas A. Rohacz1, Olivia S. Sakhon1, Katrina Sherbina2, Alondra J. Vega2. 1) Biol, Loyola Marymount Univ, Los Angeles, CA; 2) Math, Loyola Marymount Univ, Los Angeles, CA.

418A
Dissecting the Regulation of the Yeast Pleiotropic Drug Response. Colin Harvey, Ulrich Schlecht, Sundari Suresh, Robert St. Onge, Ronald Davis, Maureen Hillenmeyer. Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

419B
Transferability of protein-protein interactions and protein function between closely related species. Hsueh-lui Ho1, Maxime Huvet2, Michael Stumpf2, Ken Haynes1. 1) Biosciences, 3rd floor Geoffrey Pope Building, Exeter University, Exeter, Devon, EX4 4QD United Kingdom; 2) Theoretical System Biology, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

420C
Measuring changes in genetic interactions over environments using iSeq. Mia Jaffe1, Gavin Sherlock1, Sasha F. Levy2. 1) Dept of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; 2) Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY.

421A
Extensive inbound and feedback signal integration by Protein Kinase A. Christian Landry1, Marie Filteau1, Guillaume Diss1, Francisco Torres-Quiroz1, Alexandre Dube1, Isabelle Gagnon-Arsenault1, Andree-Eve Chretien1, Ugo Dionne2, Anne-Lise Steunou2, Andrea Schraffl3, Jacques Cote2, Nicolas Bisson2, Eduard Stefan3. 1) Département de Biologie, PROTEO and Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS), Université Laval, Québec, Québec, G1V 0A6, Canada; 2) Département de Biologie Moléculaire, Biochimie Médicale et Pathologie, et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec, G1V 0A6, Canada; 3) University of Innsbruck, Institute of Biochemistry and Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck (CMBI), A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.

422B
Genome-scale analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains evolved for bio-ethanol production under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions. Kevin S. Myers1,2, Nicholas M. Riley3,4, Trey K. Sato2, Joshua J. Coon3,4,5, Audrey P. Gasch1,2. 1) Laboratory of Genetics, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; 2) Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; 3) Department of Chemistry, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; 4) Genome Center, UW-Madison, Madison, WI; 5) Department of Biomolecular Chemistry, UW-Madison, Madison, WI.

423C
A gene network model of cellular aging and its applications. Hong Qin. Biology, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA.

424A
Genetic pathways involved in response to the phenol-based compounds bisphenol-A (BPA), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Shravya L. Raju1, Julia Levy2, Elizabeth Martin3, Mia Pecora1, Gretchen Edwalds-Gilbert1,2,3. 1) Scripps College, Claremont, CA; 2) Pitzer College, Claremont, CA; 3) Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, CA.

425B
Widespread changes in the yeast protein interaction network in response to diverse environmental cues. U. Schlecht1, J. Smith1, A. Celaj2, S. Suresh1, M. Miranda1, R. W. Davis1, F. Roth2, R. P. St.Onge1. 1) Biochemistry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; 2) Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

426C
TheCellMap.org: storing and visualizing genetic interactions in S. cerevisiae. Matej Usaj1, Michael Costanzo1, Chad L. Myers2, Brenda Andrews1, Charles Boone1, Anastasia Baryshnikova3. 1) Donnelly CCBR, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 2) Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3) Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.

427A
Unraveling protein network evolution through whole-proteome cross-species interactome mapping. Haiyuan Yu. Biological Statistics and Computational Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


Global Analysis: Other Yeasts

428B
Functional Characterisation of Candida glabrata Open Reading Frames with no Orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lauren C. Ames1, Jane Usher1, Ilias Kounatidis2, Petros Ligoxygakis2, Ken Haynes1. 1) Biosciences, University of Exeter, United Kingdom; 2) Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, UK.

429C
Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of the industrial yeast species Dekkera (Brettanomyces) bruxellensis. Anthony Borneman1, Lucy Joseph2, Toni Cordente1, Robyn Kievit1, Ryan Zeppel1, Warren Albertin3, Isabelle Masneuf-Pomarede3, Linda Bisson2, Chris Curtin1. 1) Australian Wine Research Institute, Urrbrae, SA 5064, South Australia, Australia; 2) Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, 595 Hilgard Lane, Davis, CA 95616; 3) Univ. de Bordeaux, ISVV, EA 4577, Unité de recherche Œnologie, F-33140 Villenave 13 d'Ornon, France.

430A
Assembling the Schizosaccharomyces kambucha genome and the dynamic transposon landscape of fission yeasts. Michael Eickbush1, Sarah Zanders1, Gerry Smith1, Harmit Malik1,2. 1) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Research Institution, Chevy Chase, MD.

431B
Evolutionary genomics of ecological speciation in Saccharomyces paradoxus. Jean-Baptiste Leducq, Lou Nielly-Thibaut, Guillaume Charron, Christian Landry. Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada.

432C
Comparative Genomics of Yeast Genome Conformation and Functional Annotation by Multiplexed Hi-C. Ivan Liachko, Joshua Burton, Jay Shendure, Maitreya Dunham. Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

433A
Identifying biological pathway targets for lipid production in Yarrowia lipolytica. Kyle R. Pomraning, Siwei Wei, Sue A. Karagiosis, Young-Mo Kim, Alice Dohnalkova, Mary S. Lipton, Galya Orr, Thomas O. Metz, Scott E. Baker. Pacific Northwest National Lab, Richland, WA.

434B
Influence of the nitrogen source on the production of volatile aroma compounds by non-conventional Saccharomyces species. Jiri Stribny, Roberto Pérez-Torrado, Amparo Querol. Food Biotechnology, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, Paterna (Valencia), Valencia, Spain.


Global Analysis: Proteomics

435C
Evaluating Common Humoral Responses Against Fungal Infections With Yeast Protein Microarrays. Paulo Coelho1,2, Hogune Im3, Karl Clemons1,2, Michael Snyder3, David Stevens1,2. 1) Dept of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; 2) Calif. Inst. Med. Res., San Jose, CA; 3) Dept of Genetics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

436A
The caveolin-binding motif of the pathogen-related yeast protein Pry1, a member of the CAP protein superfamily, is required for in vivo export of cholesteryl acetate. Rabih Darwiche1, Vineet Choudhary1, David Gfeller2, Olivier Michielin2, Vincent Zoet2, Roger Schneiter1. 1) Division of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, University of Fribourg , 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland; 2) Molecular Modeling, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics , Quartier Sorge, Batiment Genopode, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

437B
Phosphoproteome analysis of the DNA damage response during S phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Dongqing Huang, Brian Piening, Corey Weinert, Amanda Paulovich. Clinical Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research, Seattle, WA.

438C
Functional profiling of the ubiquitin-proteasome system of protein degradation. Anton Khmelinskii1, Bernd Fischer2, Joseph D. Barry2, Matthias Meurer1, Daniel Kirrmaier1, Michael Costanzo3, Charles Boone3, Wolfgang Huber2, Michael Knop1. 1) Center for Molecular Biology of the University of Heidelberg (ZMBH), DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, Heidelberg, Germany; 2) European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Genome Biology Unit, Heidelberg, Germany; 3) Banting and Best Department of Medical Research and Department of Molecular Genetics, The Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

439A
Stable-seq: High-throughput Analysis of in vivo Protein Stability. Ikjin Kim1, Christina Miller1,2, Stanley Fields1,2,3. 1) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 3) Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

440B
Proteomic analysis and metabolic exploration of Yarrowia lipolytica under different culture conditions. J. Shi, W. Chen. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

441C
Identifying global changes in protein acetylation following heat shock. Rebecca E. Sides, Jeffrey A. Lewis. Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.

442A
Identification of long-lived proteins in cells undergoing repeated asymmetric divisions. NH Thayer1,2,3, C. Leverich1,3, E. Marsh1, M. Fitzgibbon1, ZW Nelson1, KA Henderson1, J. Hsu1, DE Gottschling1. 1) Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) These authors contributed equally to this work.

443B
A systematic investigation of small metabolite interactions with regulatory proteins in yeast. G. X. Yang, X. Li, M. Bruno, M. Snyder. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.


Global Analysis: Technology

444C
Measuring stress response in Saccharomyces cervisiae using Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis (IROA) for metabolome-wide quantitation. Felice A. de Jong, Chris Beecher. IROA Technologies LLC, Ann Arbor MI.

445A
50:50 and IpO: Two new PCR-based methods for marker-free, seamless genome modification in yeast. Joe Horecka, Angela Chu, Davis Ronald. Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

446B
Multiplex, marker-less genetic engineering in S. cerevisiae. Andrew Horwitz, Max Schubert, Jack Newman. Amyris, Emeryville, CA.

447C
Biosensors engineered from conditionally stabilized ligand-binding domains. Benjamin Jester1,2, Christine Tinberg3, Justin Feng4, Dan Mandell5, George Church5, David Baker1,3, Stanley Fields1,2,6. 1) Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 3) Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 4) Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 5) Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 6) Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

448A
Acetylation of carotenoids in Yarrowia lipolytica improves cell viability and titers. Lisa Laprade, Maria Mayorga, Chris Farrell, Peter Houston, Dan Grenfell-Lee, Joshua Trueheart. DSM Microbia, Lexington, MA.

449B
Phenomic Analysis of TOR Signaling and dNTP Metabolism. Sean M. Santos, Chandler Stisher, Darryl Outlaw, Jingyu Guo, John L. Hartman, IV. Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

450C
An automated system for time-lapse imaging of microbial biofilms. Adrian Scott, Aimée M. Dudley. Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA.

451A
Development of ODELAY, a scalable, automated, multiparameter growth rate analysis platform, and application to a yeast model of Parkinson’s disease. David J. Dilworth1, Alexander V. Ratushny1,2, Thurston E. Herricks1, Jennifer J. Smith1, Song Li1, John D. Aitchison1,2. 1) Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA; 2) Seattle Biomedical Research Institute, Seattle, WA.

452B
Genome Wide Manipulation of Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using CRISPR-Cas9 Transcription Factors. Justin D. Smith1,2, Ulrich Schlecht2, Sundari Suresh2, Ron W. Davis2, Leopold Parts3, Robert P. St. Onge2. 1) Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA; 2) Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; 3) Genome Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.


Global Analysis: Other

453C
Seeking a metabolic understanding of chronological aging. Haley Albright, Crystal Maharrey, Daniel Smith, John L. Hartman IV. Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL.

454A
Systems biology guided engineering of reduced ethanol production in industrial wine yeast. Anthony R. Borneman, Cristian Varela, Simon Schmidt, Paul J. Chambers, The Australian Wine Yeast Systems Biology Consortium. Wine Biosciences, The Australia Wine Research Institute, South Australia, Australia.

455B
Instant killing of yeast for protein studies during continuous culture. Sara S. Dick, Khyla Rose Alorro, Sean McNabney. Biology, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN.

456C
Uncovering the biophysical impact of sequence variation. Kathryn M. Hart, Jasper Rine. University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.

457A
Reverse Two Hybrid, a systematic approach for identifying genes and pathways that regulate a specific protein- protein interaction. Ifat Lev, Marina Volpe, Shay Bev Aroya. Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel.

458B
Profiling of Saccharomyces yeast populations in two British Columbia vineyards and wineries. J. Martiniuk, V. Measday. Wine Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

459C
Staying current and modern: Overhauling an actively-used model organism database website. Kelley M. Paskov, Stacia R. Engel, Gail Binkley, J. Michael Cherry. Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

460A
Underlying the phenotypic contribution of a single quantitative trait locus in yeast are effects of seven genes and their epistatic interactions. R. Shapira, T. Benbenishty, L. David. ANIMAL SCIENCES, FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY SCIENCES, THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM, ISRAEL, REHOVOT, ISRAEL.

461B
Stability and Patterning in Microbial Communities: Lessons from Engineered Yeast Populations and Mathematical Modeling. Wenying Shou1, Babak Momeni1, Kristine Brileya2, Matthew Fields2. 1) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 2) Montana State University, Bozeman, MT.

462C
Regulation of biofilm development through the simultaneous activation and repression of functionally distinct extracellular proteins. Zhihao Tan1,2, Michelle Hays1, Cecilia Garmendia-Torres3, Gareth A. Cromie2, Amy Sirr2, Eric W. Jeffery2, Patrick May4, Aimée M. Dudley1,2. 1) Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2) Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle; 3) Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Illkirch, France; 4) Luxembourg Center for Systems Biomedicine, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.


Academic Teaching

463A
Interdisciplinary research on anticancer ruthenium complexes links undergraduate courses and improves student learning and confidence. Pamela Hanson1, Laura Stultz2. 1) Biology Department, Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, AL; 2) Chemistry Department, Birmingham-Southern College, Birmingham, AL.

464B
The 15-week PhD: research methods training for MS Biotechnology students through laboratory investigations of yeast cell physiology. Robert M. Seiser. Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt Univ, Schaumburg, IL.

465C
PubChase Career Advice - a crowdsourced mentoring forum for academic scientists. Meru Sadhu2, Alexei Stoliartchouk1, Lenny Teytelman1. 1) ZappyLab, Kensington, CA; 2) University of California, Los Angeles, CA.